Clyde Street

Learning, Teaching, Performing

Guest Post: Krishna Tunga on T20 World Cup Cricket

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Introduction

I have great pleasure in presenting a second guest post on Clyde Street. In July, Greg Blood wrote about Human Performance, Sport Science and Technology.

Today, Krishna Tunga is sharing his work on the T20 World Cup in Sri Lanka.

Krishna and I have been corresponding for a number of years about observing and analysing cricket.

He is the author of the allthatcricket.com blog.

T20 World Cup

In this Tournament, the team that has batted first has averaged 155 runs (162, if  the 7 over reduced game is omitted). At the last T20WC, at end of 12 games the average score was 149 for the team batting first.

When considering both innings, there have been 8 occasion when teams scored more than 170 runs.

The Scoring Rate for the Tournament is 1.70 runs per ball.

A Boundary has been scored every 6.36.

To date only Pakistan has won the toss and the game.

There have been 20 Dropped Catches. Fourteen of these missed catches were  by  lower ranked teams (including Zimbabwe and Bangaladesh). 10 of these dropped catches came before the 10th over, and 10 came after the 10th over.

Of the 134 wickets that have fallen in 12 games, spinners (including part-time spinners) have taken 45 of these (33.58%).

There have been 12Maiden overs: 3 came while batting first and 7 came between the 6-10 over period.

The Top 4 batters in each team have contributed 67.36% of the total team’s score.

Scoring more than 50 runs : out of 26  scores of more than 50, openers have scored 4 of them.  18 of the 50+ scores came while chasing.

Partnerships: there have been seventeen 50+ partnerships, 5 were for the opening stand (4 came while chasing). The average opening stand is 28.00.

Phases of the game: average runs scored at end of 6 overs is 45. This is the best in two years. The average falls to 65 at the end of the 10th over. It increases to 100 at end of 15th over. The bottleneck appears to be between the 7th and 10th overs where batsmen slow down (while chasing). 5 maiden overs were bowled in this period.

Big overs (more than 10 runs): in the first five games of the Tournament, there was very little action (especially for the team to bat first) in the first 6 overs of the innings. Very few ‘big overs’ were conceded. During these first 5 games, in the power play the first team tobat saw only 6.67% (2/30 Overs) of big overs and overall it was 16.67% (10/60 Overs ). The total big overs in all 20 overs was  23.50%(47/200 Overs).

Here is what happened after 12 games. Below is percentile of big overs (> 10runs/over) in each phase.

Phases 1st Bat 2nd Bat Total
0-6 overs 26.38% 25.75% 26.10%
7-10overs 26.66% 10.81% 19.50%
11-15overs 30.90% 23.30% 27.60%
16-20 overs 50.84% 44.00% 48.80%

Average runs scored have been:

Over

Avg runs in each over 1st Bat

Average runs in each over 2nd bat

1

5.33

5.91

2

5.92

7.82

3

6.92

7.45

4

6.5

9.82

5

11.4

7.91

6

8.92

6.45

7

6.83

5.18

8

8.09

5.7

9

8.27

6.2

10

7.09

5.9

11

6.27

5.44

12

6

7.11

13

9.73

6

14

8.64

8

15

7.91

6.63

16

7.18

9.71

17

9.55

10

18

9.45

6.5

19

13.2

10.3

20

12.7

4.5

 

Implications?

If top order batsmen can keep their heads, and not lose more than 1 wicket in the powerplay, a score above 150 can be achieved. A score of 170 will be challenging, and is an equivalent of 300 score in ODIs.

For bowlers apart from picking up early wickets, the key for them would between the 6th and 10th overs, where they can strike hard and bowl maiden overs which will elevate the asking rate to more than 10 runs per over and climbing, as they reach last phase.

Photo Credit

Waiting for 3rd umpire’s decision

Author: Keith Lyons

Clyde Street has been my WordPress blog since June 2008. I write about learning, teaching and performing.

One thought on “Guest Post: Krishna Tunga on T20 World Cup Cricket

  1. Pingback: IV.T20-WC.SL | All That Cricket

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