Clyde Street

Learning, Teaching, Performing


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In the Shire … Sharing

I was delighted to be invited to participate in SportsTech 2012.

The event was “geared towards presenting technological solutions for grass roots sports. It’s about managing and co-ordinating sports efficiently and effectively”.

It was held in the Sutherland Entertainment Centre.

I have posted a copy of my presentation here. I am grateful to Alex Mednis for the invitation to present some ideas about sport and technology.

I thought the input from the speakers was outstanding. Graham Annesley, Member for Miranda and the NSW Minister for Sport and Recreation opened the Conference. Graham provided an excellent context for the conference and his discussion of technology gave me a great start to my presentation.

The speakers were:
Jeff Vlahovich, Cancer Council NSW
Chris Woutersz, Aware Education
Rex Levi, Sutherland Shire Junior Water Polo Association
Kerry Turner, NSW Department of Sport & Recreation
John Reid, Australian Drug Foundation
Joshua Sprake, Sutherland Shire Junior Water Polo Association
Assoc. Prof. Paul Jonson, University of Technology, Sydney
Kelly Dowling-Jones, Clayton Utz
Nadia Di Lorenzo, Yogabody
Alex Mednis, thinkrelativity


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ProCurate

I wrote a post about voluntary and professional associations yesterday.

In the post I quoted Steve Rosenbaum:

Associations are a veritable content creation machine. These groups of thought leaders are blogging, tweeting, meeting, and plugging in to social media with innovation and enthusiasm that in many ways surpasses many of the media organizations.

While media is suffering from audience erosion, as the web gives readers and viewers and ever widening array of choices — association membership remains strong and solid. Why? Because professionals need access to high quality information, professional networking, and professional development resources that a consortium of their fellow members can provide.

I have been writing about curation and aggregation in this blog and am always delighted to find discussions about activities that I see as central to communities of practice.

I am a great fan of Produsage.

This has prompted me to think about an activity that might be called ProCurate. I see this as the collection of digital information with the aim of making it available openly for others to find and develop. I think it is a conscious and deliberate activity infused with reciprocal altruism.

A post by Deanna Dahlsad focused my thinking today (I had missed this earlier post). She proposes that:

Content curation is the process of sorting, arranging, and publishing information that already exists. Like any collector or museum curator, content curators identify and define their topics, select which items to include (and often how they are displayed), while providing the context, annotations, and proper credits which not only assist their readers but identify themselves as more than interested but invested; a leader or an authority.

It seems to me that curation is an act of commitment too.

I liked her comparison of blogging and curation:

Many bloggers spend their time selecting what they consider the best of what other people have created on the web and post it at their own sites, just like a magazine or newspaper. Or they provide a mix of this along with writing or otherwise creating their own content.  Not to split hairs, but curation involves less creation and more searching and sifting; curation’s more a matter of focused filtering than it is writing.

Shortly after reading Deanna’s post a tweet led me to Paul Wallbank’s post about Managing your digital estate. He observes that:

Dealing with the passing of a loved one is always difficult but today we have an added complexity of dealing with the online problems of social media sites suggesting people still “like” the deceased or valuable documents locked into cloud computing services.

With more of us storing information into cloud computing services, having important data locked away becomes a real risk and how online storage or software companies deal with deceased estates becomes important.

Paul’s post summarises policies for dealing with a deceased’s profile on Facebook, LinkedIn, Google, Twitter, Apple, Amazon and PayPal. He points to Mashable’s post 7 Resources for Handling Digital Life After Death. In that post Erica Swallow observes:

After someone passes away, their digital assets live on in the form of computer files and data online. For some, that’s not a big deal. But for others, the thought of leaving digital assets unattended for eternity after death is unthinkable.

I had not seen the seven resources Erica mentions. As a result of Paul and Erica’s posts I see the activity of ProCuration as a custos role too.

This custos role is being exemplified for me at the moment with the Paralympic Wikipedia project.

Photo Credits

Library

Scrapbook


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Voluntary and Professional Associations: Signal and Noise

I receive regular blog post alerts from the Scholarly Kitchen.

The Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) established the Scholarly Kitchen blog in 2008.

SSP’s mission is:

To advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking.

The Scholarly Kitchen, a moderated and independent blog, aims “to help fulfill this mission by bringing together differing opinions, commentary, and ideas, and presenting them openly”.

I admire the way The Scholarly Kitchen goes about sharing openly. I have linked to their posts in a number of my posts.

This morning Kent Anderson has a stimulating post about associations. In his introductory comments he observes:

It’s no secret that associations and membership organizations are facing generational, attitudinal, practical, and economic challenges simultaneously. Many things are going on, but a sampling shows how profound the challenge is becoming:

  • Younger people don’t want to join organizations they see as either irrelevant to them or as fusty leftovers of their parents’ or grandparents’ generation.
  • Organizations haven’t shifted their value propositions sufficiently — they haven’t trimmed benefits to match their members’ needs or added the right new benefits, which means they have value propositions that are hard to explain or just plain wrong.
  • Time pressures are everywhere but associations and societies have bylaws, structures, and practices that demand a lot of time and commitment. You have to work your way up to Board work; there is only one big meeting per year; or all meetings demand travel and multiple days away.
  • Dues are expensive relative to other things competing for the same money — as much as a new iPad or an airplane ticket. All these things compete for money, and there is less discretionary income at the same time.

These trends seem to be cultural universals for voluntary organisations as well as professional associations.

In his discussion of these trends, Kent links to Harrison Coerver and Mary Byers’ 2011 book Race for Relevance: 5 Radical Changes for Associations. He links to a Steve Rosenbaum post too.

Harrison and Mary suggest that relevant associations:

  1. Have a small, competent Board
  2. Empower staff and the CEO
  3. Examine membership categories
  4. Rationalize programs
  5. Build a framework for the future

In his discussion of the framework for the future, Kent links to Steve Rosenbaum and the role of associations in information filtering at a time of digital overload.

Steve suggests that:

Associations are a veritable content creation machine. These groups of thought leaders are blogging, tweeting, meeting, and plugging in to social media with innovation and enthusiasm that in many ways surpasses many of the media organizations.

While media is suffering from audience erosion, as the web gives readers and viewers and ever widening array of choices — association membership remains strong and solid. Why? Because professionals need access to high quality information, professional networking, and professional development resources that a consortium of their fellow members can provide.

Steve adds that:

Professionals need access to high quality information, professional networking, and professional development resources that a consortium of their fellow members can provide.

I am fascinated by how individuals and groups share (or do not share) information. Much of my thinking these days is related to open sharing and the flourishing that is possible through such sharing.

I appreciated Kent’s discussion of relevant associations and am grateful to him for the links to Harrison, Mary and Steve. I believe that knowledge and learning organisations can help distinguish signal from noise and do so in a ubiquitous and asynchronous way.

It necessitates addressing a clear point made by Steve:

So thinking about how to share information from other sources, and how to walk the line between making members aware of other voices without necessarily endorsing them is a complex bit of content calculus.

I think it is trust that can address this complexity. I see trusted collaboration as both energy giving and energy saving. I see this becoming increasingly personalised too.

Photo Credits

Curation Nation Book Party

Woman sitting on a beached boat reading a book

Share @ Mehanata Bulgarian Bar, NYC


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The End of the World is not Nigh?

I am grateful to my son, Sam, for alerting me to Lycerius’s dilemma.

I’ve been playing the same game of Civ II for 10 years. Though long outdated, I grew fascinated with this particular game because by the time Civ III was released, I was already well into the distant future. I then thought that it might be interesting to see just how far into the future I could get and see what the ramifications would be. Naturally I play other games and have a life, but I often return to this game when I’m not doing anything and carry on. The results are as follows.

  • The world is a hellish nightmare of suffering and devastation.
  • There are 3 remaining super nations in the year 3991 A.D, each competing for the scant resources left on the planet after dozens of nuclear wars have rendered vast swaths of the world uninhabitable wastelands.

I found the post through Marvin Tokhai. He observed:

Whilst browsing Reddit’s r/gaming Subreddit last night I came across a post from Lycerius who has had a game of Sid Meier’s Civilisation II on the go for 10 years! I found it amusing and left it at that…

Returning to it this morning the post has gone viral leading to its own dedicated subreddit r/theeternalwar and even Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg has jumped on the band wagon. Sky News also found this newsworthy.

After reading Lycerius’s post I wondered about the parallels with investment in high performance sport.

The military stalemate is air tight. The post-late game in civ II is perfectly balanced because all remaining nations already have all the technologies so there is no advantage. And there are so many units at once on the map that you could lose 20 tank units and not have your lines dented because you have a constant stream moving to the front. This also means that cities are not only tiny towns full of starving people, but that you can never improve the city. “So you want a granary so you can eat? Sorry; I have to build another tank instead. Maybe next time.”

Lycerius’s goal for the next few years “is to try and end the war and thus use the engineers to clear swamps and fallout so that farming may resume. I want to rebuild the world. But I’m not sure how. If any of you old Civ II players have any advice, I’m listening.”

Photo Credit

Civilization II


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Aruba, Darrell, Stephen and Max

Early this morning I was looking at some information about my blog.

I have been thinking about open sharing after receiving an invitation from Darrell Cobner to write about blogging.

WordPress offers a range of information about blog visits.

For the first time the geo-locator utility showed that Clyde Street had received three visits from Aruba.

At approximately the same time I received Stephen Downes‘ OLDaily from Moncton, New Brunswick. In today’s OLDaly Stephen points to his blog post on Feelings in Science. In the post Stephen observes:

when I reflect on my own practice it does seem to me that my own work is based in forming connections – though, more specifically, it is based in acting as a node in a network, and not in network-forming per se (I think the concept of ‘building networks’ is a bit misleading; if we want to be a part of a network we must be in the network, as a node, and not outside it

A few hours later I was listening to Michael Cathcart interviewing John Ironmonger about The Notable Brain of Maximilian Ponder. In this novel:

the central character wants to record every thought he’s ever had, every memory, every aside, every piece of odd knowledge picked up by reading the back of a cereal box. Maximilian Ponder also wants to leave his brain to science, and believes in the power of his increasingly absurd project. Unfortunately, he’s also stuck in 1975.

I am hopeful that someone in Aruba found something of interest in Clyde Street that might be relevant in 2012. Darrell has helped me clarify how this relevance can be shared.

As ever Stephen has demonstrated the energy created by sharing connections.

By the end of the day, Aruba, had moved off my geo-locator page:

… but had been in my network and had linked the Caribbean and a small village node in Australia.


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InSPIRING

There will be an official opening of the InSPIRE Centre at the University of Canberra this week.

I see the Centre as a physical tipping point in my own thinking about and practice in educational technology.

I like the idea of being InSPIRED and hope to spend much of my nomadic time at the University in the Centre.

The Hiperwall there is just one of the many tools for engagement and connection.

The imminent opening of the Centre has encouraged me to think about the ethos that underpins connected and emerging communities.

Thanks to a link from Stephen Downes to a MediaShift Idea Lab post by Jonathan Stray about visualising documents, I discovered a 2009 post by Dan Schultz that helped me clarify my thoughts.

I have written about reciprocal altruism in this blog and I have been exploring the invisibility of openness. Dan’s post was an excellent catalyst for my thinking. His post is titled In Search of a Community That Takes ‘Me’ Out of Social Media.

He concludes that:

Community tools exist, but they are drastically underpowered… As a result, they are drowned out by the far more successful alternatives… To change this, we need something that can:

  1. Host niche communities without isolating them from the rest of the world.
  2. Give individuals a chance to shine without letting their egos dominate the content.
  3. Attract enough people to drive collective intelligence, while maintaining the level of granularity needed to provide a truly personalized experience.

That isn’t too much to ask for… right? I personally believe that these systems will be the key to meeting community information needs.

I think we will have an opportunity to address these issues in and through the InSPIRE Centre. The Centre:

is a learning commons, a place to imagine, experiment and design new ways of working and learning digitally. INSPIRE services highlight quality teaching and contemporary learning practices through staying connected to global initiatives and trends about learning design and design thinking. We focus on a futures perspective and developing foresight, not just knowledge and skills.

I am hopeful that my visits to the Centre will help me explore learning ethnographies of the emergence of inspirational practice.


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Critical Care Nursing: Sharing Insights

I had the good fortune to work with some remarkable critical care nurses today.

We were exploring how to develop a Wikiversity resource to support continuing professional development.

I feel more comfortable each time I use Wikiversity but I have lots to learn. I am hoping that this project will help me do so.

James Neill is helping with the back office part of this project and the whole idea is the brainchild of Holly Northam.

I am hopeful that this project will have the energy exuded by Ian Miller in his blogging.

Ian aims with his eclectic mix of reflections, tutorials and articles to:

educate, to stimulate some introspection, to inform and amuse. More importantly, they are offered in the hope that they might be used as a jumping off point to inspire other nurses to think about their own practice, to explore the latest research, best practice guidelines, and to search out and deepen their knowledge, improving the quality of care they deliver.