Clyde Street

Learning, Teaching, Performing


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A Winning Edge?

Australia’s Winning Edge 2012-2022 high performance plan was announced at the Melbourne Cricket Ground this morning.

In a press statement it was reported that the Winning Edge :

  • Outlines a new business model for Australia’s high performance sport system
  • Sets targets for Australia to be: a top five nation at the Olympics and Paralympics;  a top 15 nation at the Winter Olympics and Paralympics; number one at the Commonwealth Games; and have more than 20 world champions annually.

The plan confirms that funding to sports will be based on “a new set of investment principles that will assess sports’ ability to provide sound evidence that they can contribute to the targets”. There will be an annual State of Sports report that will provide details of how sports perform against their plans.

The Edge affirms that there will be “a greater focus on investing, developing and retaining coaches and more money invested in supporting more athletes”. The Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) will allocate an additional $20 million in these areas in the forthcoming Olympic and Paralympic cycle. The AIS will open its campus to more athletes to use its training environment, sports science, recovery and rehabilitation facilities.

There will be an annual Sports Draft Camp to identify potential champions in Olympic, Paralympic and Commonwealth Games sports.

The Australian Sports Commission’s website has a downloadable copy of the plan with additional documents on:


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#HPRW10: Megatrends and Megashocks

Stefan Hajkowicz presented the final keynote of the High Performance Research Workshop at the Australian Institute of Sport in Canberra. Stefan is a principal research scientist who leads CSIRO’s Sustainable Regional Development (SRD) research theme.

Stefan’s talk looked at Megatrends and Megashocks. CSIRO published Our Future World: an analysis of global trends, shocks and scenarios in April 2010. The report noted that a megatrend “is a collection of trends, patterns of economic, social or environmental activity that will change the way people live and the science and technology products they demand.”

The report identifies five interrelated megatrends:

  • More from less. This relates to the world’s depleting natural resources and increasing demand for those resources through economic and population growth. Coming decades will see a focus on resource use efficiency.
  • A personal touch. Growth of the services sector of western economies is being followed by a second wave of innovation aimed at tailoring and targeting services.
  • Divergent demographics. The populations of OECD countries are ageing and experiencing lifestyle and diet related health problems. At the same time there are high fertility rates and problems of not enough food for millions in poor countries.
  • On the move. People are changing jobs and careers more often, moving house more often, commuting further to work and travelling around the world more often.
  • i World. Everything in the natural world will have a digital counterpart. Computing power and memory storage are improving rapidly. Many more devices are getting connected to the internet.

A ‘megashock’ is “a significant and sudden event; the timing and magnitude of which are very hard to predict. “The report identified eight megashocks relevant to Australia:

  • Asset price collapse
  • Slowing Chinese economy
  • Oil and gas price spikes
  • Extreme climate change related weather
  • Pandemic
  • Biodiversity loss
  • Terrorism
  • Nanotechnology risks

Stephen points out that “Our megashocks are based on 36 global risks identified by the World Economic Forum in 2009, from which we have identified eight risks particularly important from an Australian science and technology perspective. These include oil and gas price spikes, pandemic influenza, biodiversity loss and extreme weather events related to climate change.”

I reference the report here and acknowledge CSIRO’s request that “if you would like to use the information in any presentations please reference the material appropriately and consistently as determined by a Creative Commons licence“.

Photo Credits

Surf Life Saving

Ternate


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#HPRW10: Connected

Day 3 of the AIS’s Performance Research Workshop in Canberra will start with a Panel Presentation. The topic for the Panel to address is How do we make the research effort into high performance sport more effective?

The panel members are: Allan Hahn, Kristine Toohey, Martin Fitzsimons, Michael McKenna and Gavin Reynolds.

This is a draft of my thoughts hosted by SlideShare:

I have added a slide to this presentation that is my pitch for the Australian research network to work together as an Open Access community.

I am looking forward to hearing the views of my panel colleagues. I will be very interested to explore the synergies between my presentation and Gavin Reynold’s views on the role the National Sport Information Centre (NSIC) can play in a shared community of practice. This is a SlideShare presentation of the NSIC’s OASIS approach presented by Gavin last year at a World Symposium of Computer Science in Sport..


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#HPRW10: Peter Kean and the benefits of technology roadmaps

Tim Kelly (AIS Performance Research Centre) introduced Peter Kean.

Peter’s talk outlined and discussed the process of technology roadmapping (TRM) as a tool for collaborative planning that might be of interest to high performance sport.

Peter suggested that a TRM is a document that:

  • Summarises a need.
  • Records information available about the identified need that has arisen from some key tends and drivers.
  • Identifies technologies
  • Provides some information for cost/benefit/time trade off discussions

Peter noted that TRMs can be developed for a ten-year time scale but acknowledged that high performance sport might have different rhythms:  2012, 2014 and 2016 as increments within a six-year plan. Sport plans could be front end loaded for 2012 whilst exploring other opportunities in the medium and longer-term.

Peter used an example of a TRM from a CSIRO and automotive industries group to share a visualisation of a TRM. (Note: Stamm, A., Thiel, D.V., Burkett, B., James, D.A., Roadmapping Performance Enhancement Measures and Technology in Swimming, The Impact of Technology on Sport III, F. Fuss, A. Subic, S. Ujihashi ed., Taylor and Francis, 2009 (in press)) For another example see Nu Angle’s Roadmapping publication.

Peter suggested that the benefits of a TRM include:

  • Identification of critical needs
  • Goals are made into steps
  • Key drivers and enablers identified
  • Resources and capabilities available noted
  • Strategy for delivery articulated
  • Outlines opportunities for competitive advantage

Peter considered next how to create a TRM. His steps include:

  • Define the scope of the boundaries
  • List drivers and needs
  • List delivery capabilities
  • Identify technology drivers and gaps
  • Identify and rank opportunities
  • Report back

He indicated that Day 2 of #HPRW10 would use this approach and brainstorm issues around twelve sports. The workshops would articulate:

  • Trends and drivers
  • Innovation needs
  • Capabilities in the national system

There are three steps to this workshop process.

Step 1: Identify Needs

  • What is the most important technology?
  • What are the bottlenecks?
  • What research is required to enable delivery?

A brainstorm matrix for this step will address: need, timeframe, obstacles, requirement and target, organisations.

Step 2: Delivery Capability

A brainstorm matrix for this step will address: requirement and target, technology/capability, target user, key sectors, technology drivers, organisation type.

Step 3: Meeting Need

A brainstorm matrix for this step will address: technology driver, potential, organisation, technology readiness level.

Peter concluded his talk with a discussion of the opportunities provided by a TRM process: strengths, what is missing? competitors’ response? He reemphasised that a TRM approach is a process. At #HPRW10 it is intended to summarise workshop discussions of roadmaps and distribute these in order to pursue opportunities systematically.

Photo Credits

Map Reading by Headlight

Captain Cook, Hyde Park


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#HPRW10 Day 2: Mapping

Day Two at #HPRW10 has roadmapping as its theme (program Day 2).

The day starts with a keynote address by Peter Kean (CSIRO) The Value of Creating Technology and Research Roadmaps. There follows (at 9.30am) a discussion of performance challenges and the key determinants of success in Olympic and Paralympic sports. Fours sports will explore their challenges: rowing, track and field, triathlon and Winter sport. After the morning break these sports will discuss:

  • Trends and drivers for the future innovation needs of the sport
  • Innovation needs
  • Capabilities of the national system

After lunch (2pm) four more sports will address their roadmap issues: swimming, water polo, sailing and canoe/kayak. The day will conclude (3.30pm) with a final group of four sports: cycling, tennis, hockey and diving.

Photo Credits

Dawn Mist

Diving In