Clyde Street

Learning, Teaching, Performing


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Connecting, Sharing and Curating

The New Year has prompted a range of posts about trends in connecting, sharing and curating.

Some examples I have found in the last few days:

Stephen Downes linked to Nick DeNardis’s post Why now is a great time to do an OAuth audit. Nick points out that “The beginning of the year is a great opportunity to start fresh and look at everything with a new set of eyes. Something that is easily overlooked is who (or what) has access to your social media accounts. It’s easy to change your password and revoke access from co-workers but it isn’t as easy to identify which websites and services have access to your accounts.”

Alistair Gray shared a link with the International Sports Management LinkedIn Group to a Dan Schawbel discussion of optimising use of LinkedIn. Dan identifies two fundamental principles of networking in his conversation with Jan Vermeiren, the founder of Networking Coach: the networking attitude (give and receive); and the Know, Like, Trust factor.

A Diigo Teacher-Librarian Group link from a Scoop.it page to an Apollo Research Institute Report (April 2011) on Future Work Skills. The Report identified ten skills “vital for success in the workforce”:

  • Sense-making: an ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed
  • Social intelligence: an ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions
  • Novel and adaptive thinking: a proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based
  • Cross-cultural competency: an ability to operate in different cultural settings
  • Computational thinking: an ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning
  • New media literacy: an ability to assess critically and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication
  • Transdisciplinarity: literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines
  • Design mindset: an ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes
  • Cognitive load management: an ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques
  • Virtual collaboration: an ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team

Robin Good observes that:

By looking at the set of emerging skills that this research identifies as vital for future workers, I can’t avoid but recognize the very skillset needed by any professional curator or newsmaster.

This week’s presenter in the #change11 MOOC, Howard Rheingold has discussed five essential literacies:

I’ve concluded that one important step that people can take is to become more adept at five essential literacies for a world of mobile, social, and always-on media: attention, crap detection, participation, collaboration, and network know-how. The effects of these literacies can both empower the individuals who master them and improve the quality of the digital culture commons.

Stephen Downes shared a great link to Alec Couros’s end of year Social Media and Open Education blog post about student work. Alec notes that:

I wanted to use the last post of the year to share a few examples of the great work that is being done by my graduate and undergraduate students. I am so very fortunate to have creative & hard-working students who are committed to improving their knowledge of teaching and learning in light of our new digital landscape. I hope that some of these examples will inspire you to take up new challenges in your own context.

These examples included student projects using: stop-motion technique; Glogster; Freemind; Xtranormal; Screenr; Jing; Voicethread; TikaTok; Prezi; and Knovio.

SlideShare compiled 12 presentations that look at change in 2012. I was particularly interested in Skytide’s 7 Online Video Trends to Watch in 2012 and the discussion of Adaptive Bitrate Streaming. Skytide suggest “As adoption of adaptive bitrate protocols grows, providers of legacy streaming methods will find themselves under increased pressure to prove their added value. Witness the recent decision by Adobe to cease further development of its mobile FlashPlayer.”

I noted from an iSportConnect alert that the Philadelphia Wings Lacrosse team is using Twitter handles on its shirts (and following on a lead from two football teams (Valencia and Jaguares de Chiapas). Whilst looking at the Twitter possibilities I saw the Twitter blog post about New Year’s Eve activity. The post includes a video visualisation of tweets.

Phil Davis has written a post for The Scholarly Kitchen, Tweets and Our Obsession with Alt Metrics, that offers another perspective on tweeting. He discusses Gunther Eysenbach’s paper in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR), Can tweets predict citations? Metrics of social impact based on twitter and correlation with traditional metrics of scientific impact. The comments on this post make for fascinating reading and raise some salutary issues for me about connecting, sharing and curating.

I thought I would end this post with a link to Tagxedo. It is a word cloud generator and I have used it here to summarise the content of this post.

Photo Credits

Connecting

Share Your Ideas

Librarian Action Figure


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Discussing Performance

I have been involved in coaching canoe slalom for the last two months. It is a busy time of the year in Australia when athletes compete for places in Australian teams. I travel to the Penrith Whitewater Stadium twice a week from my home in Mongarlowe. Each visit involves a 600 kilometre round trip and during these trips I listen to Radio National … there are some great programs at 4 a.m. to help focus my attention on the very quiet roads (I missed this program on recommendation and social networks!).

All week I have been musing about the CCK08 wrap held on Tuesday morning (Australia time) and it is fascinating how many other items have attracted my attention this week. I thought I would bring all these strands together in this post to explore some of my interests in performance and the connectedness of people and ideas. My most recent journey on Saturday morning (28 February) was the catalyst. During that journey between Braidwood and Tarago I listened to a fascinating discussion of whistleblowing in the workplace between The National Interest‘s presenter Peter Mares and Labor MP Mark Dreyfus, the chair of the Legal and Constitutional Affairs committee. The discussion was framed by this observation “History tells us that there’s usually a high price to be paid for whistle-blowing. Organisations being challenged understandably turn nasty and there have been few protections, even for individuals who act out of a sense of honesty or integrity.”

The next hour from Tarago to Exeter was filled by Music Deli. Many years ago I worked at Dartington College of Arts and became fascinated by ethnomusicology at a time when my interest in ethnography was developing. Saturday morning’s program provided a great stimulus to reflect on those times. In the program there were two studio sessions the first featured the clarinet player Bobby Dimitrievski and his band from Sydney. He talked about his Macedonian musical heritage. In the second session, Italian musician Enrico Noviello sang, played and talked about traditional music from Puglia. I was enraptured by Bobby and Enrico’s discussions of oral tradition in music making. The podcast can be found here.

Early on Tuesday morning I was set for the CCK08 discussions and was keen to be part of the sharing ethos so prevalent in CCK08 and to be involved in the practice of connectedness. Stephen wrote that he was delayed in participating in the Elluminate session by clearing snow at his home, I failed to arrive at all because of Comet Lulin (C/2007 N3 Lulin). Conversations about CCK08 between the thirty-two participants went on without me and I became an asynchronous participant! However, I did see the comet pass over my part of Australia and thought that the once in a thousand years experience was a very important moment for me. (It was interesting to note other networks at work during Lulin’s journey and noted this set of photographs from the Alborz Mountains in Iran.) On reflection CCK08 was that kind of experience for me too.

I have written a number of posts about CCK08 in this blog and most of them are reflections-in-action. I have written some reflections-on-action too. As a result of CCK08 I think and act differently. My understanding of teaching and learning has been transformed and I hope I have a group of friends who will amplify my understanding and practice. My participation in CCK08 was part of a wonderful cosmos of energy, thought and engagement that CCK08 brought.

I have stored many of the resources shared in CCK08. I am storing my photograph of Lulin too!

lulin

I took a series of photographs with a Fuji camera using varying settings. Some of them have no trace of the comet! In retrospect that seems to be some course participants’ experience of CCK08 as they discussed the tools and knowledge required for participation in CCK08. Throughout the course I discovered new ways to communicate and share. I hope that by taking a fallibilist approach to learning I grew my understanding by the on-going inclusion of ideas and tools.

I mentioned earlier that I had been listening to Radio National. It struck me that no one talks about being a lurker of radio channels. I discovered the term ‘lurker’ during CCK08 discussions and note that it reappeared in the Wrap discussions. I have assumed that each of us has a different approach to engagement in learning. I find it hard to use the verb ‘to lurk’ let alone call someone a ‘lurker’. I noted too that there was some discussion about what to call a CCK ‘course’. I have tended to think of courses in a very literal sense. In the sport of canoe slalom participants navigate their way through a series of gates. On natural rivers the flow of the water varies as does the course of the river. Water courses and canoe slalom courses vary enormously even during the same event. I felt very comfortable in CCK08 and like Oh Laura was ‘a glass of water longing for the ocean’. I think the Wrap had some excellent suggestions for CCK09.

What struck me about many of the participants in CCK08 was their polymath interests. Last week there was enormous discussion about another polymath, Gail Trimble. This post attracted my attention on Thursday last week. I read, in particular, that:

The acclaim she has received for her stellar knowledge – “In the cautionary poem by Hilaire Belloc, what was the ‘trick that everyone abhors’, practiced by Rebecca…” to which she correctly answered “slamming doors” – has not been one-way. She has been ridiculed on social networking sites for being too geekily smart and one newspaper this week asked: “Why do so many hate this girl simply for being clever?”

I find it remarkable that a person with such a wonderful knowledge could be viewed as a threat to anyone. It seemed to me that CCK08 was able to celebrate knowing and the introduction of guests amplified the course for me. I am hopeful that CCK09 will develop its use of guests and the explicit role of the external voice that Dave Cormier provided. I am keen to participate in CCK09 and to be part of the evolution of a very special community. Next time around I may be even a participant in Moodle!

Whilst pondering all this I was dipping into Facebook and catching up with friends. One of my friends, Michael Herlihy, has been very active this week and has posted some great videos. (I have posted this about one of his video posts.) Michael posted two videos about sport performance and the videos provide an excellent end to my week of contemplating performance and the connectedness of people and ideas.

CCK08 opened up the enormous possibilities of growing through sharing. I have spent much of my last thirty years in elite sport. In this environment it was assumed that success was based upon secrecy. Michael’s video post about the analysis of Irish sporting performance offers an interesting juxtaposition of the openness and secrecy debate.

Alistair Gray offers this assessment of Ireland’s performance at the Beijing Olympics



This is Pat Hickey‘s response

The Irish Times gives its take on the review of Irish Olympic performance here and provides this brief summary of the key points of the review of performance.

What is exciting for me is that this discussion is a public one. CCK08 has given me enormous confidence to pursue an openness approach to performance that recognises that sharing enables transformation. There have been so many instances this week where the power of sharing is so evident. I see possibilities everywhere. I am excited that they are real opportunities rather than imagined connections.