Clyde Street

Learning, Teaching, Performing


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Clyde Street 2012

dscf7272I wrote 260 posts on Clyde Street this year. This has been my fifth year with WordPress.

I see this blog as a way of capturing and sharing items linked to learning, teaching, coaching and performing. It is a public portfolio of my interests and one that I access wherever I am in the world.

I was surprised to learn that Clyde Street had 70,000 visitors this year with the Olympic and Paralympic months being the busiest time of the year.

The pages that attracted most interest in 2012 were:

List

dscf6128The topics for my posts during the year were:

January (Olympics, Connecting and Sharing, Reading, Bruce Coe, Wikis, Communicating, QR Codes, Coaching, Megatrends.)

February (Open Learning, Women’s Football, Cycle Tourism, Performance, Rugby, Decision-Making, Mobility, Sport Coaching Pedagogy, Olympics, E-portfolios, Reading, Wikiversity, Canoe Slalom.)

March (Sport Coaching Pedagogy, Analysis of Performance, Wikipedia, Coaching, Presentation, Autism, Communication.)

April (Performance, Simulation, Autism, Open Learning, Crime and Sport, Olympics, Sport Coaching Pedagogy, Coaching.)

May (Olympics, Open Learning, Sport Coaching Pedagogy, Billy Cart Derby, Writing, Enterprise Computing, Space, E-portfolios, Coaching, Performance, Critical Care Nursing, Cycling Research, Educational Technology.)

June (Olympics, Writing, Transit of Venus, Euro 2012, Augmented Reality, Robin Poke, Procurate, Tennis, Charles Reep, Sport and Technology, Penalty Shoot Outs.)

July (Olympics, Euro 2012, Learning Design, Fandom, Cross Country Skiing, Pathbrite, Greg Blood Guest Post, Blogging, Goal-Line Technology, AFL, Tennis, Performance, 9.79, SOOC, Writing, Learning, Australian Art.)

August (Coaching, Olympics, Writing, Strategic Losing, Performing, Super 15 Rugby, Open Education, Chaos, Learning, Paralympics, Place and Space.)

September (Paralympics, Open Access, Coaching, R U OK, Environments.)

October (Grand Final Weekend, SOOC, Flipping and Connecting, Challenge Conference, Vocaroo, St George’s Park, Data, Conservators, Integrity, Honours’ Presentations.)

November (Australian Sport Technology Conference, Attention, OAPS101, South Africa 1995, Coaching, Performing, Notational Analysis, Einstein’s Office, Narrative, Winning Edge.)

December (QR Codes, Game Changing, Ecological Perspectives on Sport, Aggregating and Curating, Searching, Connecting, Drupal, Coaching, Goal-Line Technology, Data Analysis, John Stevenson, SOOC, Open Learning, Cowbird, Sport and Technology.)

I am looking forward to blogging in 2013. Thank you to everyone who found my blog this year.

 

Photo Credits

Year of Reading in Mongarlowe

Rain in Mongarlowe

 


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Integrity and Presentation

Last month I posted about blogging as a scholarly activity.

I linked to Stephen Downes’ observations about blogging including the point that “blogs have a readership to which you have to be accountable”. I liked Stephen’s suggestion that “a blog is not a single blog post, it is a totality of blog posts, with a myriad of purposes, all blended together”.

Earlier this week I wrote about accidental reading and the role of editors. That post was prompted by a Radio National discussion about changes in reading habits. I mentioned the program trail that asked “Is the switch to a more visual medium just an aesthetic shift or is it part of a broader trend of simplifying our knowledge base?”

This morning I received an alert to Kent Anderson’s post, Data Integrity and Presentation – Journalism, Verfication, Skepticism and the Age of Haste, in The Scholarly Kitchen. In his post Kent looks in detail at an Atlantic post about PLoS One browsing metrics and access. At the time I accessed Kent’s post there was a vibrant discussion taking place in the Comments section.

In his post Kent observes “We’re in a data-driven era, and we need to become better at presenting, analyzing, critiquing, and drawing conclusions from data”. His exhortation took me back to Scott Flemming‘s thoughtful comments on blogging as a scholarly activity. I share with him a desire for rigour and quality assurance in blogging that seeks to advance scholarly debate away from formal peer review processes.

Kent’s post took me back to a course I attended at the London School of Economics in the early 1980s. The course was titled Deciphering Sociological Research and was taught by Gerry Rose. In that course Gerry sought to encourage forensic insight into reading published papers. I thought it was an excellent introduction to veracity and validity.

My juxtaposition of these sources and experiences is a way for me to develop my own thinking about integrity in the presentation and sharing of ideas. I have used two of my trusted sources (Stephen and Kent) and insights gained from an outstanding teacher.

I am an inveterate sharer and realise that the act of sharing has responsibility and accountability. I do find blogging a wonderful way of sharing these ideas transparently and aspiring to bisociative vision.

Photo Credit

Cross Referencing


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Considering Blogging as a Scholarly Activity

Introduction

A few weeks ago I was invited to blog about blogging.

I have had a number of responses to the post and in this post I want to share points made by a colleague, Scott Fleming.

Three other contributions have prompted this post:

I liked Stephen’s observations about blogging including the point that “blogs have a readership to which you have to be accountable”. He argues that:

Sometimes they (blogs) set the scene, define terms, flesh out detail, and a host of other non-persuasive tasks such that, once the reader hits a blog post intended to persuade, they have some sense of where the author is coming from. And a blog might not even have a point it is trying to make; not everything in the world is about persuading people. Blogging is more complex – far more complex – than the simple persuasive essay, because a blog is not a single blog post, it is a totality of blog posts, with a myriad of purposes, all blended together. (My emphasis)

In their discussion of connected learning, the Digital Media and Research Hub suggest:

Connected learning builds on what we’ve long known about the value and effectiveness of interest-driven, peer-supported, and academically relevant learning; but in addition, connected learning calls on today’s interactive and networked media in an effort to make these forms of learning more effective, better integrated, and broadly accessible. (My emphasis)

The configuration of these ideas provide a context for the sharing of Scott’s ideas below. Before I present them I would like to add a footnote from Alfred Schutz.

In The Phenomenology of the Social World, Schutz writes:

As we have said repeatedly, the structure of the social world is by no means homogenous. Our fellow men and the signs they use can be given to us in different ways. There are different approaches to the sign and to the subjective experience it expresses. Indeed, we do not even need a sign in order to gain access to another person’s mind; a mere indication can offer us the opening. This is what happens, for instance, when we draw inferences from artifacts concerning the experiences of people who lived in the past. (Walsh, G. and Lehnert, F., 1972. The Phenomenology of the Social World. Northwestern University Press, p.132.) (My emphasis)

A Comment on Blogging About Blogging

With Scott’s permission I am posting his comments about Blogging About Blogging here in full. They are:

I am not a blogger, and a bit like the way I use Twitter, I’m a lurker (though that does seem like rather a sinister description). But for those who have the skills blogging is a rich medium – and writing a good blog is every bit as demanding as writing for other purposes.

One of the bloggers I do follow is Tom Watson MP, a friend from my youth. Tom’s blog is interesting in all sorts of ways, not least because of the way that he and it have provoked reaction from other bloggers. One political blogger in particular has explained that the motivation for his blog is to “make mischief at the expense of politicians and for the owner’s self gratification”. Public accountability of the powerful is highly desirable – especially when they are elected representatives. It’s also good fodder for political satire. But how do readers know the status and authority of the blog? How do readers know whether the criticism of Tom and his work is fair and reasonable?

In a clumsy way this example illustrates what I think are thought by many to be the two main objections to blogs and blogging in academic work:
(1) the rigour of the blog is sometimes unclear;
(2) the ways that blogs are used are not quality assured.
Keith’s post from a few weeks ago opens up debate about these (and other) matters.

Here are some further thoughts:
• In keeping with many contemporary debates about active engagement in the generation and sharing of knowledge, blogs are participatory and interactive. There’s an important point here. Podcasts, for example, might be more user-friendly to many technologically sophisticated young (and no-so-young) adults at modern universities, but they are still essentially instruments of information-giving. Blogs, like tweeting and other social networking media do create a real forum for dialogue.
• Blogs are immediate and accessible. In some areas of academic life progress can seem painfully slow. By the time research is in the public domain it’s already out of date or even obsolete. By using a medium that allows instantaneous sharing of information, some work can have influence without delay.
• As in other walks of life, blogs cultivate criticality and accountability about research. There are probably more opportunities for researchers to be held to account through an exchange of views or interrogation using blogs than in the system of so-called ‘blind peer review’ that many academic journals use.
• Within certain parameters they grant a freedom of expression that is fair, democratic and respectful. This doesn’t mean that all views expressed are held in the same regard. Reputations do count. But so too does the opportunity to establish credibility. I noticed recently a blogger being asked to make his credentials clear to provide authority for the opinion expressed in his blog.
• There are codes of conduct (as well as the law of the land) to guide and constrain bloggers, but there are fewer ‘rules’ to follow. There isn’t (yet) a way of blogging that prevents those without the know-how from participating. This is liberating and even emancipating for people with something of value to say who can’t say it using other media.
• Blogs are often personal opinions. As reflective practice gathers momentum in many different contexts (not least for research, learning and teaching), opportunities to share opinions with others are valuable in themselves and also as a stimulus for others.

It’s not all good, of course. As well as the caution about validity and reliability of information shared through the use of blogs, there may be concerns that the medium is deliberately misused. But if we start denying the usefulness of anything to which these criticisms might apply, there would be many other forms of sharing research that would be brought into question.

So here’s my take-home message: blogs can make a useful contribution to academic debate too. (And perhaps I’m now ready to ‘de-lurk’.)

In Response

I am delighted that Scott and I have exchanged thoughts about blogging. I was fortunate to be a colleague at the University of Wales Institute Cardiff (now Cardiff Metropolitan University) and have been an admirer of his work for two decades. I think his comments demonstrate an openness that is the hallmark of exceptional scholars.

The points that resonate with my experience in Scott’s comments are:

  • writing a good blog is every bit as demanding as writing for other purposes
  • blogs are participatory and interactive
  • Blogs, like tweeting and other social networking media do create a real forum for dialogue
  • Blogs are immediate and accessible
  • blogs cultivate criticality and accountability about research
  • There are codes of conduct

Unsurprisingly, I liked Scott’s concluding observation that “blogs can make a useful contribution to academic debate”.

Earlier in this post I mentioned Alfred Schutz’s assertion that “There are different approaches to the sign and to the subjective experience it expresses”.

I feel very strongly that the emergence of user friendly blogging platforms transformed the possibilities for scholarly communication. I believe that the freedom these platforms brought has created a very important sense of responsibility and accountability. I think there is an awareness of the fallibility of this enterprise too.

Blog posts are very public statements and the digital memory created by posts is a wonderful exhortation to address the rigour and quality assurance that Scott mentions in his comments. These points made by Scott reminded me about The Scholarly Kitchen’s discussion of Can Article Retractions Correct the Scientific Record?

I think blog posts are a very effective way of sharing scholarly endeavour. One point I am keen to explore with Scott is the ideas of an infinite paper and refining scholarship. My example comes from my research into the life and work of Charles Reep.

I wrote about Charles in February 2011. A year later Neil Lanham asked me to correct the article and I did so with information he shared with me. Last month contributors to a Brentford Football Club forum pointed to some issues about Charles Reep and Brentford. I addressed their points in a specially researched and written post. My original post now has these corrections included with a note about the change. These changes are not marginalia they are text corrections and updates.

The idea of a blog post as an emergent set of ideas and empirical specification is very attractive to me. My own thinking about this was transformed by the appearance of Commentpress from the Institute of the Future of the Book. Their mission statement in part is:

Academic institutes arose in the age of print, which informed the structure and rhythm of their work. The Institute for the Future of the Book was born in the digital era, and so we seek to conduct our work in ways appropriate to the emerging modes of communication and rhythms of the networked world. Freed from the traditional print publishing cycles and hierarchies of authority, the Institute values theory and practice equally, conducting its activities as much as possible in the open and in real time.

My involvement in a wikipedia project in Paralympic sport has encouraged me to think carefully about shared voices in academic discourse. I am very comfortable with the likelihood that Wikipedia articles will change for two very important reasons. Firstly, there are custodians in the Wikipedia community who monitor the quality of articles. Secondly, the articles themselves have very clear logs of contributors and changes made.

I do see blogging as a vibrant commitment to open access to ideas and data. I think we can be vigilant and employ the criticality Scott mentions. We can do so in near real time and without paywall exclusion.

I am heartened that there is a growing community of bloggers that trust each other and through the ensemble of their work exhibit a distinctive blend of ideas and scholarship.

I am immensely grateful to Darrell Cobner for the opportunity to blog about blogging and the Scott for sharing some challenges to the art of blogging. I note that the opinions expressed by me in this post are mine alone except where I have made explicit reference to the work of others.

Thank you for reading the post.

Photo Credit

Scott Fleming


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Aruba, Darrell, Stephen and Max

Early this morning I was looking at some information about my blog.

I have been thinking about open sharing after receiving an invitation from Darrell Cobner to write about blogging.

WordPress offers a range of information about blog visits.

For the first time the geo-locator utility showed that Clyde Street had received three visits from Aruba.

At approximately the same time I received Stephen Downes‘ OLDaily from Moncton, New Brunswick. In today’s OLDaly Stephen points to his blog post on Feelings in Science. In the post Stephen observes:

when I reflect on my own practice it does seem to me that my own work is based in forming connections – though, more specifically, it is based in acting as a node in a network, and not in network-forming per se (I think the concept of ‘building networks’ is a bit misleading; if we want to be a part of a network we must be in the network, as a node, and not outside it

A few hours later I was listening to Michael Cathcart interviewing John Ironmonger about The Notable Brain of Maximilian Ponder. In this novel:

the central character wants to record every thought he’s ever had, every memory, every aside, every piece of odd knowledge picked up by reading the back of a cereal box. Maximilian Ponder also wants to leave his brain to science, and believes in the power of his increasingly absurd project. Unfortunately, he’s also stuck in 1975.

I am hopeful that someone in Aruba found something of interest in Clyde Street that might be relevant in 2012. Darrell has helped me clarify how this relevance can be shared.

As ever Stephen has demonstrated the energy created by sharing connections.

By the end of the day, Aruba, had moved off my geo-locator page:

… but had been in my network and had linked the Caribbean and a small village node in Australia.


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Blogging About Blogging

I have been blogging for some time.

This WordPress blog dates back to June 2008.

I have Blogger, Tumblr and Posterous blog accounts too.

This week a friend, Darrell Cobner, asked me to write about blogging. He is an accomplished blogger and I was delighted that he asked me.

Darrell’s request was for me to address:

  • What is blogging?
  • Why blog?
  • What is the impact?
  • What are the rules of engagement?

I started drafting this blog post just after I had read John Kessel’s delightful Celebrating Together post on the USA Volleyball blogs site. His opening paragraph addresses implicitly Darrell’s questions:

Just finished our annual meetings in Salt Lake City, where all the USAV leaders come to share their season’s experiences and best practices and plan ahead to grow the game anew. This being an Olympic Year, our CEO Doug Beal shared a special powerpoint at the Congress, celebrating the achievements of volleyball in the USA, aka USA Volleyball in his State of the Game.  It is shared here, since so many of you reading this blog could not be in Salt Lake, yet you are growing the game so well in your part of our nation – we wanted you to celebrate too.  CLICK HERE to download and read it, you will learn a lot about how the Team behind the Team, which is all of us, are doing at USA Volleyball.

Explicitly, here are my thoughts on Darrell’s questions.

What Is Blogging?

Wikipedia has a very clear description of blogging:

A blog is a personal journal published on the World Wide Web consisting of discrete entries (“posts”) typically displayed in reverse chronological order so the most recent post appears first. Blogs are usually the work of a single individual, occasionally of a small group, and often are themed on a single subject.

Stephen Downes adds that:

Though blogs are typically thought of as personal journals, there is no limit to what may be covered in a blog. It is common for people to write blogs to describe their work, their hobbies, their pets, social and political issues, or news and current events.

The uptake of blogging was accelerated by easy to use blog platforms like Blogger and WordPress. Both provided and continue to provide ways for the uncomplicated upload of content. This makes blogging a very personal activity.  The author creates, uploads and monitors content of the blog.

In recent years Twitter has made microblogging an everyday activity that enables the exchange of short sentences, web links, and pictures.

Why Blog?

I mentioned John Kessel’s  Celebrating Together post on the USA Volleyball blogs site earlier. I return to it here to help explain why blog.

In the paragraph I quoted John makes the following points:

  • Just finished our annual meetings in Salt Lake City, where all the USAV leaders come to share their season’s experiences and best practices and plan ahead to grow the game anew.
  • Our CEO Doug Beal shared a special powerpoint at the Congress, celebrating the achievements of volleyball in the USA.
  • It is shared here, since so many of you reading this blog could not be in Salt Lake, yet you are growing the game so well in your part of our nation – we wanted you to celebrate too.  CLICK HERE to download
  • You will learn a lot about how the Team behind the Team, which is all of us, are doing at USA Volleyball.

John’s post exhibits two fundamental aspects of the why blog discussion:

  1. There is an unconditional commitment to sharing experiences and resources.
  2. The topic is of the author’s choice and narrative style.

I see blogging as a voluntary contribution to a community. Whenever I attend a conference or workshop I blog live so that those not attending can access information if they wish.

An example is my blog posts from the Computer Science in Sport Conference (Special Emphasis: Football) at Schloss Dagstuhl, Germany in 2011.

I blog to share my interests in performance and this leads me to share data from my research activities.

An example is my blog posts about performance at the 2010 FIFA World Cup.

What I find particularly exciting about this approach is:

  • There is no expectation that anyone will read any post.
  • Occasionally people comment on the posts and this leads to thought-provoking exchange.
  • It contributes to a world that flourishes through reciprocal altruism.

What Is The Impact?

Blogging offers an immediate way to share information or discuss ideas.

I have posted 619 times to my blog since June 2008. This is a rich record for me of items of interest to me and a cloud resource I draw upon when meeting others interested in learning, teaching, coaching and performance. To date I have had 112,000+ visitors to the site.

I saw a big spike in readership during the 2010 FIFA World Cup.

Thereafter searches on Google yield some of my posts.

The availability of alerts to blog posts on topics or by a particular author has transformed the impact of blog posts.

In contemplating the impact of blog posts I am mindful of Todd Sieling’s advice about slow blogging.

Slow Blogging is a willingness to remain silent amid the daily outrages and ecstasies that fill nothing more than single moments in time, switching between banality, crushing heartbreak and end-of-the-world psychotic glee in the mere space between headlines. The thing you wished you said in the moment last week can be said next month, or next year, and you’ll only look all the smarter.

I am conscious that if we are to use blog posts as an indicator or reach and impact then we must engage in slow blogging.We must think too about the tags we use to point to the slow blogging outputs.

I think microblogging with Twitter offers an alternative for the immediate response to events.

What Are The Rules Of Engagement?

It is a public space

Back in 2007 Tim O’Reilly suggested that “I do think we need some code of conduct around what is acceptable behaviour, I would hope that it doesn’t come through any kind of regulation it would come through self-regulation.” One of his seven recommendations was:

Don’t say anything online that you wouldn’t say in person.

Kate Carruthers’ advice

In my own blog I have an About page. On it I say:

This is a personal blog. Kate Carruthers has a great guide to rules of engagement for personal blogs. I try to follow her rules.

Kate’s rules are great!

  • This is my personal blog and I write it for my own personal satisfaction.
  • Readers are encouraged to comment, debate and discuss.
  • I moderate all comments and publish most, unless they appear (to my totally subjective gaze) to be defamatory, spammy, hate-mongering, not particularly constructive, or just plain rude/crude.
  • It’s fine to disagree with me, but I’m unlikely to publish your comment unless you display a modicum of style and intelligence.
  • if you do not provide a real name/identity/email I may choose not to publish your comments.
  • Real people who stand by their comments are cool!
  • This blog discusses ideas but does not purport to provide formal business, technology, psychology or finance advice.
  • Readers should seek (and probably pay for) advice of that nature from a professional source.
  • The content on this website is provided “as is” with no warranties, and confers no rights.
  • The opinions expressed here are my own and do not represent views of any clients or employers in any way.
  • Nothing posted here should be considered official or sanctioned by any of my clients or employers or any organisation I am affiliated with.
  • Feel free to quote liberally from this blog if you want – please link back in the best web tradition if you use any material provided here and give credit for material used.

Sharing openly and open about sharing

Richard Byrne has a helpful post from 24 May 2011 that contains some detailed advice about:

  • What to do when you see your blog posts being stolen
  • What to do if you want to reuse someone’s blog post(s)

In Conclusion

I have written this post from the perspective of a person who seeks to share through blogging. I recognise that there are other motives to blog.

I am excited by the reflective potential of blogs in education and sport settings.

I facilitated a Sport Coaching Pedagogy unit at the University of Canberra last semester. One of the requirements of the unit was to develop a blog as a journal. I have compiled a list of the 60 blogs produced by the students on a Wikiversity page.

Perhaps the next discussion with Darrell will be about wikis … but not before some more of John Kessel’s post:

The final night of meetings before play begins, is the “Boyce Banquet” in honor of Dorothy C. Boyce.  Dorothy joined USAV in 1952 as a consultant on women’s volleyball and took on many leadership roles over her 22 years of involvement, including being USAV Vice President for a decade.  Traditionally, I sit at the banquet with Mike Hulett, who, if you don’t know of him…well dang it you should. I knew what was coming, as I had contributed a lot of photos of Mike, having been with him for decades as he helped head coach in our USA Paralympic programs. So take time to read the link award below, and watch the video ( CLICK HERE to watch) that I took of his surprise in being honored with USA Volleyball’s highest award, the Frier (named after the USAV leader who almost singlehandedly got volleyball into the 1964 Tokyo Olympic Games, just one of those things that we all should know and celebrate too…).  Mike’s achievements are something we ALL should celebrate in volleyball.  Just another thing USA Volleyball does to help volleyball for all, including the disabled of all ages.

http://usavolleyball.org/news/2012/05/25/mike-hulett-selected-as-usavs-2012-frier-winner/48119?ngb_id=2

Thank you for finding time to read this post. There are some other posts about blogging here.


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Sharing Openly and Open About Sharing

I glimpsed a tweet by Richard Byrne this morning:

Just sent this to a good friend who had much of her blog’s content plagiarized. So Your Content Got Stolen, Now What? http://bit.ly/H79gXu

I have a great interest in open access and sharing so followed up on Richard’s lead.

I discovered an excellent resource on his blog Free Technology for Teachers.

Richard’s tweet linked to a post from 24 May 2011 that contains some detailed advice.

  • What to do when you see your blog posts being stolen
  • What to do if you want to reuse someone’s blog post(s)

Richard links to Sue Waters‘s advice too:

I have followed Richard and Sue’s work for some time and am awe struck by their altruism. Bloggers like Richard and Sue (as well as the indefatigable Stephen Downes) have inspired me to encourage students to develop their own e-portfolios.

I hope I have encouraged them to understand that reciprocal altruism is a wonderful characteristic of open access. I will affirm with them Richard’s point from Sue:

… while the web is all about sharing, it’s also important to respect the time and effort that a person puts into his or her blog posts.

This means that we must be careful about the auto posting RSS feeds noted in Richard’s update.

I will remind them about Creative Commons licences too.

Photo Credit

Sharing

 

 


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100,000th Visitor

The Clyde Street blog passed a small milestone this morning.

At 6.35am (AEST) a visitor from the United States became the 100,000th visitor to the site.

In the last three and a half years I have written 574 posts on a range of topics linked to teaching, coaching, learning and performing.

I have found the WordPress platform the perfect host for my blogging.

I am fascinated by the potential and actuality of sharing openly. I see blogging as an invitation to others to explore ideas.

Looking back at all my posts I realise that I have a detailed record of my thought process since June 2008.

In this time the five most visited posts have been:

A post from the CCK08 MOOC that has attracted gardeners.

An analysis of goals scored at the 2010 FIFA World Cup.

A discussion of the life and work of Lionel Logue.

A post about Erica McWilliam and the 21st Century Teacher.

Medal Predictions for 2012 London Olympic Games.

Some of the posts of unexpected interest have been about krumping, John Ruskin, W E H Stanner, Hill 60 and yarn bombing.

I see a number of my posts as alternatives to peer review publication. Whilst I realise that the numbers of visitors to a post are not indicators of its impact I am excited by the possibility that readers can access information that is freely and openly available on the public web.

Since I started posting at Clyde Street the amount of data available for secondary analysis has grown enormously. Blogging provides a vibrant opportunity to engage with these data.

I have noticed a significant change in search behaviours since 2008. WordPress provides an excellent dashboard to monitor these trends. I use a lot of Creative Commons images in my posts and these images provide an anchor for search activity. I do try to be very clear about my tags and images but sometimes feel I disappoint searchers when my sense of a tag and image does not meet theirs.

One on my CCK08 posts exemplifies this. I used an image of the Twelve Apostles from the Great Ocean Road in Victoria to help me develop the theme of ‘stacks’. I get a lot of hits on this post relative to its content but it has taught me to think carefully about ambiguity in tagging and categorising.

I hope to continue blogging as a personal discipline. I am keen to encourage the development of e-portfolios and this Semester at the University of Canberra have an opportunity to work with students to initiate their work in this area.

Whenever I write a blog post I am mindful that it is a voluntary public act.  I am staggered by the quality of blogging available to us.

I am elated that 100,000 people have visited Clyde Street and hope that not all visitors have arrived through a misdirected search.