Clyde Street

Learning, Teaching, Performing


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Visualising Olympic Performance

I receive a daily update from the Diigo Teacher-Librarian Group.

Yesterday Cathy Oxley shared three Olympic resources with Group members.

All three have an interesting approach to visualising Olympic performance.

SBS

SBS has produced a medals results page for all the Olympic Games in the modern era.

It appears as a map of the world.

The 2012 graphic is:

The medals for the first Olympic Games of the modern era were:

The New York Times

The New York Times has a visualisation of all medalists in three events in the modern era:

Performances are presented relative to Usain Bolt’s 2012 Olympic record.

I think this interactive visualisation is remarkable. It has set a new standard in how we share information about athletic performance.

The Slate

The Slate brings together eight contestants in four events (the 100-metres sprint, 100-metre freestyle swim, the long jump, and the discus) to bring together athletes from different Olympic eras (1896 to 2008).

 

I think these are wonderful resources. I am very impressed by the SBS medal selector and mesmerised by the New York Times visualisation … all thanks to Cathy Oxley’s links.

 

 

 


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Cirrus 111203

A brief Cirrus post to end the week.

I read with interest news of a Little Printer via a Scholarly Kitchen post. Berg has produced the printer and reports that:

Little Printer wirelessly connects (with no configuration) to a small box that plugs into your broadband router. . . . your phone is your remote control. We think of BERG Cloud as the nervous system for connected products.

There is more information about the Little Printer on Matt Webb’s post.

By coincidence the Scholarly Kitchen page had a link to an interview with Clay Johnson.

Marc Slocum notes that:

Clay Johnson (@cjoh), author of the forthcoming book “The Information Diet,” believes the information overload problem is actually an information consumption problem. In the following interview, Johnson explains how reframing the issue around consumption and taking ownership of our info intake are the keys to finding information balance.

One of my consumption issues is how to curate the information I gather. My cirrus posts are one way of doing this for me. My blog has become a repository. This week I was interested to find Lyn Hay‘s post (via a Diigo Teacher-Librarian Group link) Content curation and the power of collective intelligence. I thought Lyn’s post was an excellent resource for a community of practice keen to connect about curation.

The Teacher-Librarian Group in Diigo brought me news of David Kapuler’s Top 100 websites for 2011. David observes of his list:

I tried to cover a wide range of sites, from flash card creators to digital storytelling and of course, social networks, which really shined in 2011.

Photo Credit

Little Printer


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Classroom Technology

In November 2000 I was invited to give a presentation to a national conference of educators on the topic of Information and Communications Technology in Physical Education.

There is a link to this presentation on SlideShare.

I was reminded of this presentation when I received a Plurking Educators Diigo link from Grace Kat. Grace pointed to a post on The Evolution of Classroom Technology.

The technologies included there:

  • Horn Book (1650)
  • Ferule
  • Magic Lantern
  • School Slate
  • Chalkboard
  • Pencil (1900)
  • Stereoscope
  • Film Projector (1925)
  • Radio
  • Overhead Projector (1930)
  • Ballpoint Pen
  • Mimeograph
  • Headphones (1950)
  • Slide Rule
  • Videotapes
  • Reading Accelerator
  • Skinner Teaching Machine
  • Educational Television (1958)
  • Photocopier
  • Liquid Paper
  • Filmstrip Viewer (1965)
  • Handheld Calculator (1970)
  • Scantron
  • Plato Computer
  • CD Rom Drive (1985)
  • Handheld Graphing Calculator
  • Interactive Whiteboard (1999)
  • Iclicker
  • XO Laptop
  • iPad (2010)

At the time I accessed the article (5 May, 2011) there were 34 comments some of which were suggesting other technologies for inclusion.

This is a collection of the images used in The Evolution of Classroom Technology:

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Fossicking in the Social Web

According to Wikipedia, fossicking is a term found in Cornwall and Australia referring to prospecting.

“This can be for gold, precious stones, fossils, etc. by sifting through a prospective area. In Australian English, the term has an extended use meaning to rummage.”

My engagement with the social web is akin to rummaging but through trusted networks I do find rich seams of resources and opportunities.

Recently (thanks to Diigo) I have rummaged through:

This morning (thanks to Stephen Downes) Crocdoc and Osmek.

Of late I have not been visiting Twitter or Facebook but know that they are there. I have started to use LinkedIn much more and have joined some new groups: ICALT, Sport for Development, Sports Performance Analysis and World Class Athlete Development.

Fossicking is a very popular activity in my village. It is an old gold town and there are hidden treasures. It seems very apt that I should be rummaging around too!

Photo Credits

Gold minehead

Bernard Otto Holtermann


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It Is Personal

A few days ago I received a link to Paul Adam’s Real Life Social Network v2 presentation at Voices That Matter Web Design Conference held in San Francisco in June 2010.

My link came from a Diigo list.

I am surprised how long it took me to catch up with this presentation.

I was the 614,122nd visitor to Paul’s SlideShare presentation.

The metrics for his presentation are fascinating:

I am fortunate that I got there after Tim Greenhalgh. He commented:

This is one of ‘the’ definitive Social Media presentations. Just to you let you know that Paul (@padday) has moved on from Google and is now at Facebook. His last email to me suggested he is having a lot of fun developing the FB social network! You can read about his New Year move on Techcrunch.

Tim’s comment took me to Liberate Media and on to this post by Lloyd Gofton about the demographics of social network use. I read the post with great interest having been primed by a number of leads provided by Stephen Downes recently to personal learning environments.

Educational Projection: Supporting Distributed Learning Online (15 March)

An open university prep course (15 March)

Welcome to access4ed.net (15 March)

Being Safe Online Is Being Safe In Life (14 March)

I had also received a link from Jane Lofton via Diigo Teacher-Librarian list to Movers and Shakers 2011 (The People Shaping the Future of Libraries). It included this group:

I was disappointed that Gwyneth was the only innovator I had encountered in my own personal learning environment.

Reflecting on this I returned to Paul’s presentation to discover where some of the downloads of his work occurred:

There is a very long list and I include part of it here to reflect on Paul’s discussion of weak and strong ties. I note (slide 122) that “online social networks make it easier to reconnect and catch up with weak ties”.

My personal learning environment is in a state of considerable flux and I wonder if it has a great deal to do with deciding to work in open spaces.

I am exploring a new range of tools to inform my learning environment. This week, for example, I revisited Netvibes, looked at CourseKit, looked at LiveBinders, checked out Linkable, tried SnipSnip, glimpsed Embedplus, and learned about Mikogo.

Perhaps I ought to plot this learning on some of the new timeline tools available (such as Tiki-Toki)! If I do, I understand that this will be profoundly personal and might be of some interest to my strong ties. If I do choose appropriate tags it may be of interest to weak ties too.

I am delighted that Paul’s presentation has helped me clarify some of these issues.

Photo Credit

Yellow Umbrella


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Linking, Connecting, Sharing

Each day I receive a range of links to blogs posts and web tools. A post from the ABC (18 January) alerted me to James Fowler, Jaime Settleb, and Nicholas Christakis’ work, Correlated genotypes in friendship networks. Their paper encouraged me to think about linking, connecting and sharing.

The abstract of their paper notes that:

It is well known that humans tend to associate with other humans who have similar characteristics, but it is unclear whether this tendency has consequences for the distribution of genotypes in a population. Although geneticists have shown that populations tend to stratify genetically, this process results from geographic sorting or assortative mating, and it is unknown whether genotypes may be correlated as a consequence of nonreproductive associations or other processes. Here, we study six available genotypes from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to test for genetic similarity between friends. Maps of the friendship networks show clustering of genotypes and, after we apply strict controls for population stratification, the results show that one genotype is positively correlated (homophily) and one genotype is negatively correlated (heterophily). A replication study in an independent sample from the Framingham Heart Study verifies that DRD2 exhibits significant homophily and that CYP2A6 exhibits significant heterophily. These unique results show that homophily and heterophily obtain on a genetic (indeed, an allelic) level, which has implications for the study of population genetics and social behavior. In particular, the results suggest that association tests should include friends’ genes and that theories of evolution should take into account the fact that humans might, in some sense, be metagenomic with respect to the humans around them.

On the same day I found the genotype paper I received a link from a friend to a Linked Data post. I noted too that week 3 of LAK11 is focusing on the Semantic Web, Linked Data, and Intelligent Curriculum (the syllabus is here). I am missing LAK11 as I am CCK11. Week 5 of CCK11 is discussing Groups, Networks and Collectives.

Diigo lists have become an invaluable resource for me too. I am tracking the Diigo Community Group; a Teacher-Librarian Group; a Plurking Educators’ Group;  a Web 2.0 Group: and a Web 2.0 Tools’ Group.

In the last year I have been exploring ecology metaphors of sharing and post regularly about items that resonate with me. I am becoming interested increasingly in the visualisation of networks. Thanks to James, Jaime and Nicholas I am off to read Erez Lieberman, Christoph Hauert and Martin Nowak’s paper on Evolutionary Dynamics on Graphs and to ponder the friendship possibilities of such dynamics.

I am sorry that I am not at the Recent Changes Camp in Canberra this weekend. However I will follow their wiki as a peripheral participant.

Photo Credit

FlickrVerse 2005

 


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Edging to Open Learning in Open Spaces

Last week I had the opportunity to visit Ballarat to discuss Edgeless Challenges and Opportunities. I have been thinking a great deal about learning spaces and the function (rather than the form) of the university of late. In part these thoughts have been stimulated by the University of Canberra’s development of teaching and learning commons.

This week I have been overwhelmed by the number of connections I am finding in relation to open learning and sharing. Some of these connections include:

many universities have an educational technology department that is focused on PD. Research institutes devoted to understanding the intersection of education, technology, systemic reform, and pedagogy are less rare. Several years ago, Phil Long (CEIT) and I discussed the need for a collaborative network of research labs/academies/institutes that were focused on researching learning technologies, not solely on driving institutional adoption. Perhaps it’s time to revisit that idea.

  • Discovering A.K.M. Maksud’s 2006 paper The Nomadic Bede Community And Their Mobile School Program after listening to an interview with Irene Khan. Boat schools bring a different perspective on edgeless learning opportunities and mobile learners. (Sharing this paper with a colleague brought me Simon Shum and Alexandra Okada’s paper Knowledge Cartography for Open Sensemaking Communities (2008) from the Journal of Interactive Media in Education and from another colleague Kenn Fisher’s discussion of Mode 3 Learning: The Campus as Thirdspace.)

  • Finding Cisco’s paper (June 2010) on Hyperconnectivity through a Diigo link. Hyperconnectivity is defined as:

active multitasking on one hand, and passive networking on the other. Passive networking consists largely of background streaming and downloading. Ambient video (nannycams, petcams, home security cams, and other persistent video streams) is an element of passive networking that opens up the possibility for the number of video minutes crossing the network to greatly exceed the number of video minutes actually watched by consumers.

  • In the past year, the Cisco paper notes that:

it has become clear that visual networking applications are often used concurrently with other applications and sometimes even other visual networking applications, as the visual network becomes a persistent backdrop that remains “on” while the user multitasks or is engaged elsewhere. This trend accompanies what is sometimes called the widgetization of Internet and TV, as network traffic expands beyond the borders of the browser window and the confines of the PC.

Traditional approaches to community regeneration which define communities in solely geographic terms have severe limitations. They often failed to deliver on key social capital improvements such as improving trust between residents or fostering a greater sense of belonging.

In this report we argue for a new approach to community regeneration, based on an understanding of the importance of social networks, such an approach has the potential to bring about significant improvements in efforts to combat isolation and to support the development of resilient and empowered communities.

  • Noting in Harold Jarche’s post Innovation through network learning that he now takes for granted his “network learning processes, using social bookmarking; blogging and tweeting, and these habits make collaboration much easier”. He observes that:

However, these habits and practices have taken several years to develop and may not come easily to many workers. One difficult aspect of adopting network learning in an organization is that it’s personal. If not, it doesn’t work. Everybody has to develop their own methods, though there are frameworks and ideas that can help.

All this before I started exploring the treasure trove that arrives in my in box each day from Stephen Downes! Early on in the week I noted Stephen’s comment on Education and the Social Web: “A theory of connections can’t be just about forming connections; it has to be about the organization, shape and design of networks of connection, patterns of connectivity. And to me, this means that we need to design learning systems to meet personal, not political, social or commercial, objectives.” Later in the week in a discussion of two MOOC posts, Stephen suggests that: “It’s about attitude and approach. If you’re looking for someone to tell you how it works, you will find a MOOC confusing and frustrating. But if you take responsibility for your own learning, you will find any connection in a MOOC either an opportunity to teach or an opportunity to learn. No instructions necessary.”

This week has underscored for me the rich possibilities that can occur in shared spaces. My thoughts keep returning to Dharavi and the opportunities for personal wayfinding in shared spaces that afford a collective, connected experience too. I am very hopeful that the University of Canberra’s Commons ideas can stimulate innovative use of place, space and time and lead to an exciting edgy practice.

Photo Credits

Kaptai Lake

Hole in Wall

Moodle on the Move

Postscript

A day after posting this I received a link to a delightful flash mob video. I wondered if open learning spaces might stimulate this kind of event.

Other Links

2nd Annual Learning Commons Development and Design Forum, 30-31 March 2011, Brisbane.

  • Learning Commons strategy and organisational structures
  • Planning and design
  • Case studies and best practices
  • Digital information and technologies
  • Online resources