Clyde Street

Learning, Teaching, Performing


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Integrity and Presentation

Last month I posted about blogging as a scholarly activity.

I linked to Stephen Downes’ observations about blogging including the point that “blogs have a readership to which you have to be accountable”. I liked Stephen’s suggestion that “a blog is not a single blog post, it is a totality of blog posts, with a myriad of purposes, all blended together”.

Earlier this week I wrote about accidental reading and the role of editors. That post was prompted by a Radio National discussion about changes in reading habits. I mentioned the program trail that asked “Is the switch to a more visual medium just an aesthetic shift or is it part of a broader trend of simplifying our knowledge base?”

This morning I received an alert to Kent Anderson’s post, Data Integrity and Presentation – Journalism, Verfication, Skepticism and the Age of Haste, in The Scholarly Kitchen. In his post Kent looks in detail at an Atlantic post about PLoS One browsing metrics and access. At the time I accessed Kent’s post there was a vibrant discussion taking place in the Comments section.

In his post Kent observes “We’re in a data-driven era, and we need to become better at presenting, analyzing, critiquing, and drawing conclusions from data”. His exhortation took me back to Scott Flemming‘s thoughtful comments on blogging as a scholarly activity. I share with him a desire for rigour and quality assurance in blogging that seeks to advance scholarly debate away from formal peer review processes.

Kent’s post took me back to a course I attended at the London School of Economics in the early 1980s. The course was titled Deciphering Sociological Research and was taught by Gerry Rose. In that course Gerry sought to encourage forensic insight into reading published papers. I thought it was an excellent introduction to veracity and validity.

My juxtaposition of these sources and experiences is a way for me to develop my own thinking about integrity in the presentation and sharing of ideas. I have used two of my trusted sources (Stephen and Kent) and insights gained from an outstanding teacher.

I am an inveterate sharer and realise that the act of sharing has responsibility and accountability. I do find blogging a wonderful way of sharing these ideas transparently and aspiring to bisociative vision.

Photo Credit

Cross Referencing


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Voluntary and Professional Associations: Signal and Noise

I receive regular blog post alerts from the Scholarly Kitchen.

The Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) established the Scholarly Kitchen blog in 2008.

SSP’s mission is:

To advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking.

The Scholarly Kitchen, a moderated and independent blog, aims “to help fulfill this mission by bringing together differing opinions, commentary, and ideas, and presenting them openly”.

I admire the way The Scholarly Kitchen goes about sharing openly. I have linked to their posts in a number of my posts.

This morning Kent Anderson has a stimulating post about associations. In his introductory comments he observes:

It’s no secret that associations and membership organizations are facing generational, attitudinal, practical, and economic challenges simultaneously. Many things are going on, but a sampling shows how profound the challenge is becoming:

  • Younger people don’t want to join organizations they see as either irrelevant to them or as fusty leftovers of their parents’ or grandparents’ generation.
  • Organizations haven’t shifted their value propositions sufficiently — they haven’t trimmed benefits to match their members’ needs or added the right new benefits, which means they have value propositions that are hard to explain or just plain wrong.
  • Time pressures are everywhere but associations and societies have bylaws, structures, and practices that demand a lot of time and commitment. You have to work your way up to Board work; there is only one big meeting per year; or all meetings demand travel and multiple days away.
  • Dues are expensive relative to other things competing for the same money — as much as a new iPad or an airplane ticket. All these things compete for money, and there is less discretionary income at the same time.

These trends seem to be cultural universals for voluntary organisations as well as professional associations.

In his discussion of these trends, Kent links to Harrison Coerver and Mary Byers’ 2011 book Race for Relevance: 5 Radical Changes for Associations. He links to a Steve Rosenbaum post too.

Harrison and Mary suggest that relevant associations:

  1. Have a small, competent Board
  2. Empower staff and the CEO
  3. Examine membership categories
  4. Rationalize programs
  5. Build a framework for the future

In his discussion of the framework for the future, Kent links to Steve Rosenbaum and the role of associations in information filtering at a time of digital overload.

Steve suggests that:

Associations are a veritable content creation machine. These groups of thought leaders are blogging, tweeting, meeting, and plugging in to social media with innovation and enthusiasm that in many ways surpasses many of the media organizations.

While media is suffering from audience erosion, as the web gives readers and viewers and ever widening array of choices — association membership remains strong and solid. Why? Because professionals need access to high quality information, professional networking, and professional development resources that a consortium of their fellow members can provide.

Steve adds that:

Professionals need access to high quality information, professional networking, and professional development resources that a consortium of their fellow members can provide.

I am fascinated by how individuals and groups share (or do not share) information. Much of my thinking these days is related to open sharing and the flourishing that is possible through such sharing.

I appreciated Kent’s discussion of relevant associations and am grateful to him for the links to Harrison, Mary and Steve. I believe that knowledge and learning organisations can help distinguish signal from noise and do so in a ubiquitous and asynchronous way.

It necessitates addressing a clear point made by Steve:

So thinking about how to share information from other sources, and how to walk the line between making members aware of other voices without necessarily endorsing them is a complex bit of content calculus.

I think it is trust that can address this complexity. I see trusted collaboration as both energy giving and energy saving. I see this becoming increasingly personalised too.

Photo Credits

Curation Nation Book Party

Woman sitting on a beached boat reading a book

Share @ Mehanata Bulgarian Bar, NYC


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The Magic of Books

I received a great link from Kent Anderson at The Scholarly Kitchen this morning.

Kent writes about a stop motion film made in the Type Books Toronto bookshop.

The Joy of Books was made by Sean Ohlenkamp and Lisa Blonder Ohlenkamp.

The film was posted on YouTube on 9 January 2012. By the time I saw it there had been 1,498,241 views.

I was delighted by the creative imaginations that made the film possible. In addition to admiring the passion that led Sean and Lisa to make the film I found myself thinking about how we can transform everyday learning environments.

I liked the soundtrack composed by Tim Westin of Grayson Matthews too.

If you would like more information about this project there is:

  • an interview with Sean Ohlenkamp in a Quill & Quire post
  • a CTV report
  • Organising the Bookcase (Sean and Lisa’s first stop motion film about books) “This weekend we decided to organize the bookcase. It got a little out of hand.”

After watching both videos I went back to a post I wrote last October about Brigita Ozolins and her Reading Room show at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery. I thought Brigita, Sean and Lisa would have a great conversation.


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Curation

I have been revising a paper I am writing on Cloud computing.

Part of the revision has involved looking at Curation.

This week I received an alert to a post by Kent Anderson, The Power of Curation … shortly after I found Brian Solis’s post The Three C’s of Social Networking.

Both posts were put into focus by Harold Jarche’s  Managing in a Networked World and a brief look at OpenCalais via a Diigo recommendation.

Etienne Wenger, Beverly Trayner and Maarten de Laat’s (2011) paper Promoting and assessing value creation in communities and networks: a conceptual framework added more detail for me about ‘knowledge capital’:

Not all the value produced by a community or a network is immediately realized. Activities and interactions can produce “knowledge capital” whose value lies in its potential to be realized later. Note that this potential can be useful even if it is never realized.

I caught a glimpse of Steve Rosenbaum’s Curation Nation too.

Postscript

Five days after I posted this I came across Morten Myrstad’s extensive post Content Curation – Growing Up and Coming of Age. It is a treasure trove of links and ideas that explores some of the business issues surrounding curation.

Photo Credit

You left the ark where?


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Communication, Social Media and the Coach

I am meeting with Robin McConnell‘s undergraduate Advanced Coaching Studies’ group on 29 April.

My discussion topic is Communication, Social Media and the Coach.

This blog post is the start of a conversation with the group in advance of the meeting.

I am keen to discuss:

  1. Coach and athlete communication.
  2. Opportunities provided by social media to share ideas and discuss performance.
  3. Augmented information.

This blog has a number of posts on these topics. I am hopeful that the students coming to the meeting have an opportunity to look at:

There are many more posts that might be of interest (and some SlideShare presentations) but I am keen to explore how students in the group engage with social media and cloud computing. I will be asking about slow reading too (Kingsley, 2010). I will recommend SIRC’s excellent social media resource and mention Wirearchy via Harold Jarche’s post Social Learning, Complexity and the Enterprise. I will point to Tom Slee’s post on social media (via Kent Anderson), Jason Kramer-Duffield’s discussion of communication ecologies and evidence about the Internet and civil society. Brian Solis posted about the social genome in his discussion of The Three C’s of Social Networking (consumption, curation, creation).

A recent report from Canada (2011) points out that:

Cloud computing is a loose and evolving term generally referring to the increasing use of computer applications that are web-based. A cloud-based application does not need to be downloaded to a user’s computer or institutional servers, and the data used by the application and inputted by the user is housed on servers elsewhere. The application works remotely: it’s not physically present, it could be anywhere in the world (hence the term “in the cloud”).

Social media applications are by definition cloud-based: Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, Blogging services like WordPress.com, Blogger, Tumblr or Posterous, or link sharing sites like StumbleUpon, Digg. Any individual may sign on and start using such services independent of their institutional affiliations.

The students in the group will graduate this year at a remarkable time. As coaches in a digital age they will become produsers of learning resources that can have profound impacts on personal learning environments.The scale of this age is indicated by Gary Hayes’ Social Media Counts (13 April 2011):

(For an alternative set of metrics see Is Social Media Ruining Students?)

I hope to end our discussions on with a consideration of leadership behaviours that will resonate with Robin’s discussion throughout the unit. I hope too that we can explore the role augmented information plays in short, medium and long-term coach-athlete relationships.

I will be suggesting that the students follow up on a great case study of the use of social media. Mark Upton and Robert Oatey have developed teamsportcoaching.com. Mark and Robert are strong advocates of coach education and are “true believers in the potential of the online medium to deliver content that can enhance a wide variety of coaching methods and disciplines”. I think Mark’s post, Creating the ‘coachable moment’ with PlayerTube and online video, exemplifies excellent use of social media based upon profound understanding of the coaching process.

After all this discussion I will recommend reading Connectivism & The Relationship Era. The post includes this observation which seems a great place to end the day’s conversation:

In the connectivist learning model, the flow of knowledge is more important than the knowledge itself. In other words, the process is more important than the content. The main reason for this is that there is a constant need for quick adaptation. In this era, knowledge must be directed quickly to where it is needed to be applied. Once it has served its purpose, it is archived and momentarily forgotten. Notice that discarding information is now practically unheard of because once the connection has been made (i.e. something is learned), it will be stored somewhere. The additional task is mere retrieval or recollection.

Postscript

In this post I am considering free social media. There are a variety of third part software services available too. A recent white paper on Becoming a Social Business (2011) observes that:

The rise in consumer-oriented social networking applications and platforms over recent years has drawn curiosity from enterprises both large and small. IDC believes that curiosity has turned into business opportunity as the lines between consumer and enterprise continue to blur. Unfortunately, adoption of social software in the enterprise has encountered some skepticism due to the hype surrounding the technology and the perception that it is the younger generations’ means for socializing with friends. It has also been criticized as being a waste of time. Yet there is evidence to suggest that this doubt is shifting and that enterprise social software is becoming the next generation of collaboration tools to enhance organizational productivity.

As an example IBM has a social software available (IBM Connections):

Photo Credits

Coaches watching the fight

Coach with the wrestler’s hat

Wrestler with his coach

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Blogging

I have been thinking about open language and practice after my post yesterday.

A friend reminded me by email about Kevin Kelly’s six verbs and a short time later I received a link to Kent Anderson’s post on blogging and respect.

Kent’s post introduced me to Michael Bhasker‘s writing on blogging including the line “Bracketing the arguments about noise to signal ratios, self indulgence and wild proliferation blogging is now a fact of the written word as much as letters, novels, newspapers and emails.”

On reading the comments on Kent’s post I found Maxine’s Petrona Blog and had some time to look at her post Start the e-revolution without me! Now that I have found her blog I hope to follow her writing.

I feel very relaxed about snowball sampling and think that a strength of blogging is the connections we can make out of our interest and value relevance. I am very optimistic about the opportunities that blogging can provide … particularly in its slow form.

I see the growth of a language of open practice as evidence of the respect trusted bloggers have for each other. I think the serendipity of discovery is a wonderful part of this practice.


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Blogging, Sharing, Sociabilty

I have been blogging with WordPress since 3 June 2008.

Since that time I have written 350 posts on topics linked to learning, teaching and performing.

Many of these topics are stimulated by links shared by Stephen Downes through OLDaily and were given impetus by a remarkable group of participants in CCK08.

A few days ago (10 March) Stephen posted about blogging and followed up the next day with a link to the self-organising social mind. I was mulling over both these posts when Kent Anderson posted about Kevin Kelly.

All three posts arrived at a time when I was completing an open tender on Wikiversity, making some plans for a visit by Nancy White, and reflecting on an observation by Graham Attwell about “the existence of multiple information and knowledge flows” through the ability of anyone to publish.

Stephen’s link to Luis Suarez’s post Making Business Sense of Social Media and Social Networking – Is Blogging Dead? and Luis’ link to Scott Monty’s Blogging is Dead exemplify the power of blogging to me. Kent Anderson’s post about Kevin Kelly and his link to Kevin’s presentation at the O’Reilly Tools of Change Conference provides an interesting context for the vibrant bloggingscape.

In his talk, Kevin points to six verbs that characterise how we interact with information, how we make and present information:

  • Screen
  • Interact
  • Share
  • Access
  • Flow
  • Generate

George Theiner’s review of John Bolander’s book The Self-Organizing Social Mind starts:

Sociability is one of the most fascinating traits of our species. As human beings, we create and participate in complex social structures with a flexibility of group membership which is unparalleled in the animal kingdom, and we are capable of entertaining a seemingly endless variety of social relationships. What if underneath our dappled social world lies a deeper kind of simplicity, which can be explained by the physics of symmetry and its breakings, akin to the processes which are at work in the formation of a snowflake or a spiral galaxy? In his insightful new book, John Bolender argues that such a view is indeed suggested by contemporary science rather than a figment of social romanticism.

I like the idea of sociability and simplicity. Blogging is a part of this relationship and I have seen it from the outset as a purely volitional activity on the part of the author and reader.

I post to share information and explore wayfinding. From early on I saw blogging as a way of developing a cloud presence that used WordPress as a vehicle for Kevin’s six verbs. I had not anticipated that anyone would read my posts.

I was delighted recently when my daughter Beth started blogging. I read her posts avidly. I have an immense amount of paternal pride and an overwhelming admiration for her desire to share information and experience. I think she has the essence of blogging that Stephen, Kevin, Luis and Scott point to.  I see Beth’s posts as another example of the resilience and relevance of blogging.