Clyde Street

Learning, Teaching, Performing


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Bandwith Approach to Supporting Learning

Yesterday’s talk by Royce Sadler at the University of Canberra has sent me off on a journey thinking about how learners flourish.

I liked Royce’s reference to texts from the last forty years. The trail for Royce’s talk had started me reflecting on Peter Dowrick’s work on feedforward and Ian Franks and Gary Miller’s (1991) paper Training Coaches to Observe and Remember.

After Royce’s talk I revisited a paper by Kristine Chambers and Joan Vickers (2006) on the Effects of Bandwidth Feedback and Questioning on the Performance of Competitive Swimmers.

The paper reported:

  • A coaching intervention involving Bandwidth Feedback and Questioning (BF-Q) on competitive swim times (cTIME), practice swim times (pTIME), and technique (TECH)
  • With a cohort of competitive youth swimmers over one short-course (25m) swim season.
  • Kristine and Joan concluded that coaching in which feedback was delayed and replaced with questions directed to the athletes contributed to improved technique and subsequent faster race times.
  • Compared to the Control group, the BF-Q group displayed greater gains in TECH during the intervention period and greater improvement in cTIME during the transfer period.

Kristine and Joan discussed two powerful issues arising from their research:

  1. It demonstrates that swimmers were aware of their ability to affect gains in personal athletic development. These results emphasize the importance of self-regulation, personal control, and active learning to efficient and heightened skill acquisition.
  2. Although swimmers described increases in mental work encouraged by their coach, the improvement in communication seemed to override any negative effects of the cognitive load. Improving coach-athlete interaction was one goal of combining questioning with bandwidth feedback. The present study supported the combined use of questioning and bandwidth feedback to enhance learning and maintain effective coach-athlete relationships.

I think this paper is an interesting empirical support for some of the points Royce made in his talk. In arguing for this resonance I am aware that I am attracted to bandwidth ideas.

Some time ago (twenty years in fact) Richard Schmidt discussed the impact frequent augmented feedback can have on learning. I liked his distinction between the performance impact of feedback and longer term learning.

Royce’s presentation, revisiting Kristine and Joan’s paper and returning to Richard’s arguments have encouraged me to work through Franz Marschall, Andreas Bund and Josef Wiemeyer’s (2007) meta-analysis of augmented feedback in the e-Journal Bewegung and Training 1. Their analysis reviews 40 papers published from 1989 to 2000.

Photo Credits

Coaches watching the fight

Coach with the wrestler’s hat


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A Mind Map and a QR Code combined to share coaching information

I have been thinking about how some of the free cloud applications can be used to support coach education and development.

This post brings together a mind map with a Quick Response Code (QR Code) to provide an example of what is possible as we become produsers of these tools.

The background story:

  • I have been researching performance in the 2011 Super 15 rugby tournament.
  • I am interested in whether the previous year’s ranking of a team impacts on its performance in the following year.
  • I have been looking at try scoring in the 120 group games in this year’s tournament.
  • I think this kind of information is a trigger for discussions about the preparation and performance of teams

I found 30 ways that teams won games in the 2011 tournament. Fortunately 13 of these occurred only once. By far the most prevalent outcome (37) was when a higher ranked team (from the 2010 tournament) scored the first converted try, was leading at half time and won the game.

I wanted to visualise these data to share with coaches and decided to use a mind map tool to do so. I had been alerted to SpiderScribe recently (via Diigo) and tried out its functionality.

It is a Beta product at the moment and so I have been conscious of managing the risk of not being able to access the map on an as need basis.

I have downloaded a copy of the map as a Pdf document as a permanent digital record of the map S1501

The link to the map I created is http://www.spiderscribe.net/app/?9d28530b20872f43b4f1aeea2d81277b which is quite an address. SpiderScribe offers a range of options for sharing a mindmap and I have chosen Public on internet – anyone on Internet can find and access it.

I used bit.ly to shorten the long address of the mind map to http://bit.ly/S1501. Bit.ly offers the opportunity to customise the shortened address. This process tracks the use of the link too.

The final step for me in this process is to allocate a QR Code to the mindmap. I use the Kaywa QR Code Generator for this purpose. I have written a number of posts about QR Codes in this blog. A post I wrote in January provides some detailed information. I see a QR code as a dynamic way to share information with iPhone and Android users.

The QR Code for the SpiderScribe mind map is:

This post is a small example of what is available to coach educators. In presenting this example I aim to share a generic approach to resource development.

I conclude with a working definition of produsage that underpins my approach to sharing and growing.

In collaborative communities the creation of shared content takes place in a networked, participatory environment which breaks down the boundaries between producers and consumers and instead enables all participants to be users as well as producers of information and knowledge – frequently in a hybrid role of produser where usage is necessarily also productive.

Photo Credit

Coaches watching the fight


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Communication, Social Media and the Coach

I am meeting with Robin McConnell‘s undergraduate Advanced Coaching Studies’ group on 29 April.

My discussion topic is Communication, Social Media and the Coach.

This blog post is the start of a conversation with the group in advance of the meeting.

I am keen to discuss:

  1. Coach and athlete communication.
  2. Opportunities provided by social media to share ideas and discuss performance.
  3. Augmented information.

This blog has a number of posts on these topics. I am hopeful that the students coming to the meeting have an opportunity to look at:

There are many more posts that might be of interest (and some SlideShare presentations) but I am keen to explore how students in the group engage with social media and cloud computing. I will be asking about slow reading too (Kingsley, 2010). I will recommend SIRC’s excellent social media resource and mention Wirearchy via Harold Jarche’s post Social Learning, Complexity and the Enterprise. I will point to Tom Slee’s post on social media (via Kent Anderson), Jason Kramer-Duffield’s discussion of communication ecologies and evidence about the Internet and civil society. Brian Solis posted about the social genome in his discussion of The Three C’s of Social Networking (consumption, curation, creation).

A recent report from Canada (2011) points out that:

Cloud computing is a loose and evolving term generally referring to the increasing use of computer applications that are web-based. A cloud-based application does not need to be downloaded to a user’s computer or institutional servers, and the data used by the application and inputted by the user is housed on servers elsewhere. The application works remotely: it’s not physically present, it could be anywhere in the world (hence the term “in the cloud”).

Social media applications are by definition cloud-based: Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, Blogging services like WordPress.com, Blogger, Tumblr or Posterous, or link sharing sites like StumbleUpon, Digg. Any individual may sign on and start using such services independent of their institutional affiliations.

The students in the group will graduate this year at a remarkable time. As coaches in a digital age they will become produsers of learning resources that can have profound impacts on personal learning environments.The scale of this age is indicated by Gary Hayes’ Social Media Counts (13 April 2011):

(For an alternative set of metrics see Is Social Media Ruining Students?)

I hope to end our discussions on with a consideration of leadership behaviours that will resonate with Robin’s discussion throughout the unit. I hope too that we can explore the role augmented information plays in short, medium and long-term coach-athlete relationships.

I will be suggesting that the students follow up on a great case study of the use of social media. Mark Upton and Robert Oatey have developed teamsportcoaching.com. Mark and Robert are strong advocates of coach education and are “true believers in the potential of the online medium to deliver content that can enhance a wide variety of coaching methods and disciplines”. I think Mark’s post, Creating the ‘coachable moment’ with PlayerTube and online video, exemplifies excellent use of social media based upon profound understanding of the coaching process.

After all this discussion I will recommend reading Connectivism & The Relationship Era. The post includes this observation which seems a great place to end the day’s conversation:

In the connectivist learning model, the flow of knowledge is more important than the knowledge itself. In other words, the process is more important than the content. The main reason for this is that there is a constant need for quick adaptation. In this era, knowledge must be directed quickly to where it is needed to be applied. Once it has served its purpose, it is archived and momentarily forgotten. Notice that discarding information is now practically unheard of because once the connection has been made (i.e. something is learned), it will be stored somewhere. The additional task is mere retrieval or recollection.

Postscript

In this post I am considering free social media. There are a variety of third part software services available too. A recent white paper on Becoming a Social Business (2011) observes that:

The rise in consumer-oriented social networking applications and platforms over recent years has drawn curiosity from enterprises both large and small. IDC believes that curiosity has turned into business opportunity as the lines between consumer and enterprise continue to blur. Unfortunately, adoption of social software in the enterprise has encountered some skepticism due to the hype surrounding the technology and the perception that it is the younger generations’ means for socializing with friends. It has also been criticized as being a waste of time. Yet there is evidence to suggest that this doubt is shifting and that enterprise social software is becoming the next generation of collaboration tools to enhance organizational productivity.

As an example IBM has a social software available (IBM Connections):

Photo Credits

Coaches watching the fight

Coach with the wrestler’s hat

Wrestler with his coach

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Creating an Atmosphere

I have had this post in draft for for a few weeks. It was prompted by a conversation I heard about Brian Ritchie‘s work with the Mona foma annual festival in Tasmania. This is a link to the 2010 Festival Site.

Brian Ritchie’s discussion of his approach to the festival encouraged me to think about how coaches create atmosphere in their training and competition environments. In an interview with the Australian Stage Brain outlined what Mona Fona is:

MONA FOMA stands for Museum of Old and New Art Festival of Music and Art. So everything that’s in the festival has something to do with music –even a visual art thing would have a musical element to it, whether it’s covering a musical idea or song and visual art combined. The idea also is to have some straight-ahead musical performances, ranging from funk to classical to noise music, a little bit of punk and other kinds of rock music here and there – but not the really commercial and boring kinds. It reflects my broad interest in music and art and also the interests of the museum.

I was particularly interested in his assessment of the festival program:

It is pretty overwhelming and it’s exhausting, maybe a little bit too ambitious – but it’s probably better to err on that side than being too cautious. I hope to refine it a bit next year, maybe simplify and not have it quite as sprawling [but] we’ll probably try to attract bigger and – well, I wouldn’t say better but more well known artists as well.

I was fascinated by how close these sentiments are to what coaches think.

This is a link to the Hobart Mercury’s review of the opening night in 2010. Nick Cave was the headline act for the 2009 Festival.

I am very interested in the points of difference coaches create in their daily training environments and how these environments translate into competition contexts. Brian Ritchie’s Wikipedia entry reports that:

Brian Ritchie (born 21 November 1960) was the bass guitarist for the alternative rock band Violent Femmes. His distinct sound comes from using Ernie Ball acoustic bass guitars, which is very uncommon in rock music. He is also one of the more high-profile users of the relatively new Barker Bass.

In addition to his bass playing, Ritchie is proficient at the shakuhachi, a Japanese bamboo flute.

I like the idea that Brian Ritchie has a distinct sound and that his musical journey led him to a completely different instrument. Once again I see enormous parallels with coaches who live continuous professional development.

Photo Credits

Atmosphere

Wrestler and His Coach