Clyde Street

Learning, Teaching, Performing


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Jeffrey Wright

JW

I am on the lookout for stories about teachers and coaches.

In February I start the Sport Coaching Pedagogy unit at the University of Canberra and am keen to exemplify what I think an expert pedagogue to be.

Today, John Kessel led me to Jeffrey Wright.

The New York Times has an 11m 54s video about Jeffrey. You can find it here. (It had 50,000 views whilst I was writing this post taking it to 648,083 views in total.)

I am delighted that Jeffrey uses explosions and extols the virtues of love. I think both are vital components of expert pedagogy.

Amongst the many stories about Jeffrey, I liked:

Tara Parker-Hope’s New York Time article

The Insider Louisville

If you were looking for a story to start 2013 I think Jeffrey is a perfect choice.

Picture Credit

Frame grab Wright’s Law (1m 26s)

 


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Visualising Olympic Performance

I receive a daily update from the Diigo Teacher-Librarian Group.

Yesterday Cathy Oxley shared three Olympic resources with Group members.

All three have an interesting approach to visualising Olympic performance.

SBS

SBS has produced a medals results page for all the Olympic Games in the modern era.

It appears as a map of the world.

The 2012 graphic is:

The medals for the first Olympic Games of the modern era were:

The New York Times

The New York Times has a visualisation of all medalists in three events in the modern era:

Performances are presented relative to Usain Bolt’s 2012 Olympic record.

I think this interactive visualisation is remarkable. It has set a new standard in how we share information about athletic performance.

The Slate

The Slate brings together eight contestants in four events (the 100-metres sprint, 100-metre freestyle swim, the long jump, and the discus) to bring together athletes from different Olympic eras (1896 to 2008).

 

I think these are wonderful resources. I am very impressed by the SBS medal selector and mesmerised by the New York Times visualisation … all thanks to Cathy Oxley’s links.

 

 

 


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Gesture and Conducting Performance

One of my first activities of the day is to read Stephen Downes’ OLDaily.

Today he has a great link to a New York Times video that discusses the art of conducting with Alan Gilbert, the music director of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra.

The video is eight minutes long.

I was interested to learn about Alan’s role as a conductor and thought that his observation that:

There is no way to really put your finger on what makes conducting great, even what makes conducting work. Essentially what conducting is about is getting the players to play their best and to be able to use their energy and to access their point of view about the music. There is a connection between the gesture, the physical presence, the aura that a conductor can project, and what the musicians produce

was a great insight into teaching and coaching too.

The video has some fascinating animations created by New York University’s Movement Lab.

A Lab blog post about the making of the animation notes that:

The Movement Lab of New York University, in collaboration with the New York Times, installed multiple high-speed motion capture cameras in a studio of the Juilliard School at New York’s Lincoln Center in order to study the movement of Alan Gilbert, world renowned Conductor and Music Director of the New York Philharmonic. Reflective markers were placed strategically on the conductor’s body.  Since Gilbert did not conduct the day’s musical program with a baton, the crew devised a novel finger capture method to record his hands.  Using advanced computer software with new visualization techniques, the team transformed this motion data, tracing the intricacies of Gilbert’s gestures and the movement behind the music.

There is a three minute video about the making of the animation too.

I think the New York Times article is an excellent resource for teachers and coaches to access.

I like Alan’s suggestion that:

One of the ways to make your sound better is to make it really obvious that you’re really listening and that it really matters to you what it sounds like. That’s not actually conducting. It’s kind of embodying or representing a kind of aspiration, if you will, and it’s uncanny how that actually can make a difference. As soon as it’s apparent that your ears are open and that you’re interested and you’re following the contour of the sound, then that very contour is affected by that.


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#HPRW10 Sharing

I have been thinking about a framework for my panel contribution at Day Three of #HPRW10.The topic for the panel to address is How do we make the research effort into high performance sport more effective?

The abstract I submitted was:

There is a wonderful momentum growing around the aggregation of effort in many aspects of social and professional life. Following on from my presentation at the NESC Forum 2009 I am going to propose that a connected network of practice is essential for sport to flourish in Australia. This connected network will be open and through aggregation will ensure that we grow a research culture that has a cumulative approach to knowledge production. For this to be really effective it will require many institutions to transform their Internet presence. I will suggest there is no wealth but life.

The resources I have looked at to develop my thoughts are:

Around the World in Eighty Seconds

(London – Cairo – Mumbai – Hong Kong – Tokyo – San Francisco – New York – London)

Social Media 2

I was struck by a recent post by Seth Godin in which he argued that:

The challenge of our time may be to build organizations and platforms that  engage and coordinate the elites, wherever they are. After all, this is where change and productivity come from.
Once you identify this as your mission, you save a lot of time and frustration in your outreach. If someone doesn’t choose to be part of the elites, it’s unclear to me that you can persuade them to change their mind. On the other hand, the cycle of discovery and engagement the elites have started is going to accelerate over time, and you have all the tools necessary to be part of it – to lead it, in fact. (Original emphasis.)

I looked at a link I received to Virtual Research Networks

and pondered the possibilities of Web 3.0. Whilst doing so I found Kate Ray’s link to a discussion of the Semantic Web (link).

Which led me to this Flickr phtograph of Tim Berners-Lee.

I followed up his Linked Data Presentation just as I received an invitation to a webinar about the Semantic Enterprise. The trail for the webinar identified Four Pillars of the Advanced Computing Enterprise

  • Data management
  • Process management
  • Access management
  • Resource management

The value proposition from the trail was that semantics help adapt and unify databases, web services and service oriented architectures (SOA), mobile devices, and cloud computing.

From other feeds I have been contemplating social media and connectedness.

Social Media: Twitter

Social Media: Facebook

Changes to Facebook’s privacy settings have been creating some very strong responses. Recent examples include Jason Calcanis’s post (12 May) and a New York Times article (11 May).

(Postscript After finishing this post I came across Mark Pesce’s article for the ABC’s  Drum Unleashed Social networks and the end of privacy. I include it here as an important contribution to the discussion of privacy. See too Stephen Downes’ (18 May) detailed special report Facebook and Privacy. Scholarly Kitchen has compiled some resources on this topic too.)

Meanwhile a colleague had shared with me a paper by James E. Powell, Linn Marks Collins, and Mark L.B. Martinez (2009), in which they observe:

We believe that high quality custom collections of content from digital libraries, and the ability to explore it, can be critically important to decision makers and first responders dealing with crises.  These collections become even more valuable when offered with tools enabled by semantic technologies.  These tools can facilitate visual and task-based exploration of the collection, and provide Web 2.0 collaboration capabilities such as sharing, commenting, rating, and tagging, which are typical of online journal clubs.

Their work set me off on an open access track that took me to Sesame (an open source Java framework for storing, querying and reasoning with RDF and RDF Schema).

Thereafter, I pursued:

The Fierce Urgency of Now, in which it is proposed that:

proactive information retrieval tools can play a significant role in information seeking for users in some situations, in particular those where it is important to quickly get a sense of what information might be available about a particular topic. This may be particularly true if a user is focused on a task that benefits from information, but is not itself an information-seeking task. Additionally, the urgency of a particular task may also make it a requirement that the user be made aware of information, rather than be forced to search for it.

I followed a steer from the authors of that paper and found Michael Twidale et al. (2007) Writing in the library: Exploring tighter integration of digital library use with the writing process. They argue that:

Information provision via digital libraries often separates the writing process from that of information searching. In this paper we investigate the potential of a tighter integration between searching for information in digital libraries and using those results in academic writing. We consider whether it may sometimes be advantageous to encourage searching while writing instead of the more conventional approach of searching first and then writing. The provision of ambient search is explored, taking the user’s ongoing writing as a source for the generation of search terms used to provide possibly useful results. A rapid prototyping approach exploiting web services was used as a way to explore the design space and to have working demonstrations that can provoke reactions, design suggestions and discussions about desirable functionalities and interfaces. This design process and some preliminary user studies are described. The results of these studies lead to a consideration of issues arising in exploring this design space, including handling irrelevant results and the particular challenges of evaluation.

Whilst reading that paper on-line I received a tweet from Radio National about its Future Tense program on the digital classroom in Australia. I ended my day enjoying a blog from one of the people in that program, Helen Otway, Assistant Principal for ICT and Student Learning at Manor Lakes P-12 Specialist College.

Just as I was closing my computer I received a link to a YouTube video (two million views in a week) from a Listserv that ilustrated the excitement and dynamism available to us as we connect as researchers and coaches.

Photo Credits

Phone-wire tangle

Linked Data