Clyde Street

Learning, Teaching, Performing


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#OAPS101 Goes Live 5 November: Starting Out

I am posting this blog post on OpenLearning today to welcome participants in the #OAPS101 course, Observing and Analysing Performance.

The course goes live later this morning.

I think we have a remarkable month ahead of us.

Starting Out

Introduction

Today is the first day of our small open online course, Observing and Analysing Performance in Sport.

Welcome.

Thank you for enrolling on the course and being part of an open approach to sharing ideas and practices.

This is going to be a wonderful learning journey for me and I hope for you too.

I have been writing about the ideas that underpin the SOOC in my Clyde Street blog. For the duration of this course I am going to use the OpenLearning blog facility as my primary blog. This way I hope to share updates and summaries with you directly.

I have posted a video welcome here. There is a written welcome here too. … and an audio welcome (using Vocaroo). Video, text and audio will be important characteristics of this course.

The Course

The characteristics of this course are:

  • It is free.
  • It is open.
  • It is self-paced.
  • It is non-linear.
  • It is an introduction to observation and analysis.
  • It shares content from a number of authors.
  • It offers open badges to acknowledge your involvement and engagement in the course.
  • Content is shared under a CC BY 3.0 license unless otherwise indicated (see for example the licenses of the three images used in this post).
  • It will flourish with discussion and sharing.
  • It will change throughout the course.
  • It will remain on the public internet as a resource for discovery and sharing.

This Week: Week 1

We recommend that you:

Look at the Connecting and Sharing resources in the About the Course Module.

Spend some time finding your way around the OpenLearning platform (including the Need Help? page) for this course.

How about …

Visiting the Getting Started Activity.

Looking at the Introduction: Connecting and Sharing.

Then checking out Connectivism.

We realise that this is a personal learning journey for all of us. One of my hopes is that we share these journeys through the open sharing of our personal learning environments. You might find the Personal Learning Environments resource of interest

Modules

This course has five modules. All five of them are available today. Other content will be added subsequently and we will let you know about any changes to content.

Our idea is for you to follow your interests.

We have set aside a month to share and discuss ideas.

I am hoping to monitor discussions and deal with any requests for clarification. Please let me know if I can be of help.

To make this a 24 hour a day experience, Darrell Cobner and his colleagues at Cardiff Met will monitor the course whilst Australia sleeps.

We do see enormous opportunities for conversations and exchange. We do not have any formal webinars planned and we are not using Universal Time stamps for our work.

We realise that what we are offering is fallible and that it is constructed by all of us.

We hope you are going to enjoy the course and I am keen to learn if I can be of any service to you as you work your way through the course. I am just an email away either through OpenLearning or at this email address.

The Whisperings Within The Course

It is fascinating to find other locations where the approaches used in the course are explored.

For example, Uberveillance‘s Ethos statement is:

This website provides the general public, the community and those afforded free and unconditional access to the world wide web, access to information regarding the concept and understandings of Uberveillance. This website provides invited Authors an opportunity to directly contribute to the development of the website whilst maintaining an open dialogue with the general public.

Uberveillance’s objective is to provide open comment that is:

  • relevant to the topic – is not selling nor spamming
  • conversational – pictures and addresses the audience
  • coherent – maintains consistency
  • respectful – provides reading enjoyment, challenge and value
  • generative – builds trust and connection

 

The spirit of this  #OAPS101 course is invitational, voluntary and supportive. It aims to build trust and connections through participation. It seeks to do so through public sharing.

Photo Credits

Dawn Platform (Isuru Senevi, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

The Road Ahead is Shrouded in Mist (Joysaphine, CC By-NC 2.0)

Share @Mehanata Bulgarian Bar, NYC (o.blaat, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)


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Voluntary and Professional Associations: Signal and Noise

I receive regular blog post alerts from the Scholarly Kitchen.

The Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) established the Scholarly Kitchen blog in 2008.

SSP’s mission is:

To advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking.

The Scholarly Kitchen, a moderated and independent blog, aims “to help fulfill this mission by bringing together differing opinions, commentary, and ideas, and presenting them openly”.

I admire the way The Scholarly Kitchen goes about sharing openly. I have linked to their posts in a number of my posts.

This morning Kent Anderson has a stimulating post about associations. In his introductory comments he observes:

It’s no secret that associations and membership organizations are facing generational, attitudinal, practical, and economic challenges simultaneously. Many things are going on, but a sampling shows how profound the challenge is becoming:

  • Younger people don’t want to join organizations they see as either irrelevant to them or as fusty leftovers of their parents’ or grandparents’ generation.
  • Organizations haven’t shifted their value propositions sufficiently — they haven’t trimmed benefits to match their members’ needs or added the right new benefits, which means they have value propositions that are hard to explain or just plain wrong.
  • Time pressures are everywhere but associations and societies have bylaws, structures, and practices that demand a lot of time and commitment. You have to work your way up to Board work; there is only one big meeting per year; or all meetings demand travel and multiple days away.
  • Dues are expensive relative to other things competing for the same money — as much as a new iPad or an airplane ticket. All these things compete for money, and there is less discretionary income at the same time.

These trends seem to be cultural universals for voluntary organisations as well as professional associations.

In his discussion of these trends, Kent links to Harrison Coerver and Mary Byers’ 2011 book Race for Relevance: 5 Radical Changes for Associations. He links to a Steve Rosenbaum post too.

Harrison and Mary suggest that relevant associations:

  1. Have a small, competent Board
  2. Empower staff and the CEO
  3. Examine membership categories
  4. Rationalize programs
  5. Build a framework for the future

In his discussion of the framework for the future, Kent links to Steve Rosenbaum and the role of associations in information filtering at a time of digital overload.

Steve suggests that:

Associations are a veritable content creation machine. These groups of thought leaders are blogging, tweeting, meeting, and plugging in to social media with innovation and enthusiasm that in many ways surpasses many of the media organizations.

While media is suffering from audience erosion, as the web gives readers and viewers and ever widening array of choices — association membership remains strong and solid. Why? Because professionals need access to high quality information, professional networking, and professional development resources that a consortium of their fellow members can provide.

Steve adds that:

Professionals need access to high quality information, professional networking, and professional development resources that a consortium of their fellow members can provide.

I am fascinated by how individuals and groups share (or do not share) information. Much of my thinking these days is related to open sharing and the flourishing that is possible through such sharing.

I appreciated Kent’s discussion of relevant associations and am grateful to him for the links to Harrison, Mary and Steve. I believe that knowledge and learning organisations can help distinguish signal from noise and do so in a ubiquitous and asynchronous way.

It necessitates addressing a clear point made by Steve:

So thinking about how to share information from other sources, and how to walk the line between making members aware of other voices without necessarily endorsing them is a complex bit of content calculus.

I think it is trust that can address this complexity. I see trusted collaboration as both energy giving and energy saving. I see this becoming increasingly personalised too.

Photo Credits

Curation Nation Book Party

Woman sitting on a beached boat reading a book

Share @ Mehanata Bulgarian Bar, NYC