Clyde Street

Learning, Teaching, Performing


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Open to Sharing

I have come across four interesting posts about sharing this week.

The Open Cloud Initiative

A Code of Practice for the Fair Use of Online Video

ALISS’s 2011 Summer Conference

An interview with Sir John Daniel

I thought all four offered excellent insights into the disposition to share openly.

The Open Source Initiative defines Open Source licensing in relation to:

  • Free Redistribution
  • Source Code
  • Derived Works
  • Integrity of the Author’s Source Code
  • No Discrimination Against Persons or Groups
  • No Discrimination Against Fields of Endeavor
  • Distribution of License
  • License Must Not Be Specific to a Product
  • License Must Not Restrict Other Software
  • License Must Be Technology-Neutral

 Sir John Daniel suggests in his interview with Creative Commons that in relation to licensing of Open Educational Resources  “My advice is to just do it and don’t get too fussed about the license at the beginning”.  He adds that “our policy simply says COL will release its own materials under the most feasible open license, which includes the Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license … we encourage people to not use noncommercial if they can avoid it, and we follow our own recommendation.”

The Centre for Social Media’s Guide to Fair Use “is a code of best practices that helps creators, online providers, copyright holders, and others interested in the making of online video interpret the copyright doctrine of fair use. Fair use is the right to use copyrighted material without permission or payment under some circumstances.”

I thought the ALISS report of the 2011 Conference on the topic of Social Media, Libraries, Librarians and Research Support exemplified this disposition to share openly. In addition to links on the conference site, papers from the conference are available on SlideShare. I liked the range of resources available.

As an aside each of the alerts to these four items came from different sources. This in itself exemplifies for me of the power of self-organising groups and networks.

Photo Credits

Maze

Lighthouse


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Open Language

UCNISS submitted an open tender to the Australian Paralympic Committee this week.

We submitted a proposal to produce A History of the Paralympic Movement in Australia, and to establish a repository of media and digitised primary resources to compliment the text.

The tender was written as a Wikiversity page.

The process of becoming open has been a great personal learning experience. I am fortunate to have had Leigh Blackall and James Neill as my guides and to access Stephen Downes’ OLDaily to extend my horizons.

Stephen has presented his ideas on The Role of Open Educational Resources in Personal Learning this week. I liked his discussion of a language of open learning:

  • We have to stop treating online resources as though they were ‘content’
  • The people who actually use them have moved far beyond that
  • These artifacts constitute a new language; they are a large, complex, post-linguistic vocabulary
  • That’s why they need to be open

Our open tender has received a great deal of interest and comment. The objections to the project we are proposing to the Australian Paralympic Committee underscore for me how important it is to revisit and develop the forms an open language may take.

I am still waiting for the arrival of Stanley Fish’s book in my local bookshop and hope the issues raised there will help me develop my open language and practice.

Advocacy of openness requires many literacies. I am keen to explore how the form of our writing contributes to the flourishing of a sustainable, collaborative approach to the produsing of open educational resources.


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Writing Week at the University of Canberra 2010

Today is the start of Writing Week in the Faculty of Health at the University of Canberra. We had a preliminary event last week with Robert Brown. His writing workshop provided an excellent stimulus for disciplined writing for publication.

This is the Faculty’s second writing week. There are some blog posts about the 2009 Writing Week in this blog. This year the Faculty has scheduled no meetings for the week in order to create time for writing. On Wednesday staff from Sport Studies are meeting the poet Harry Laing at the Old Cheese Factory at Reidsdale to develop our writing skills. We are in for a treat judging by an excerpt from his poem Wordsmith:

…Cold forgery is impossible,
Words must bleed from a hot core –
They bulb at my fingertips
Exuded like beads of mercury, my sons
Hatched from the ashes and into the blaze with them
See those salt blue flames singing at the margins –
That is spirit, quicker than embers
Thumping, banging smith-spirit.

 

Whilst the Faculty’s Writing Week is in its second year Meanjin is celebrating its seventieth anniversary. A recent Radio National Book Show (24 November 2010) celebrated the anniversary and discussed the role of literary publications in a digital world. The discussions about a published journal compared to an on-line journal mirrored debates in the academic world about open access.

It was interesting to listen to Jim Davidson and Christina Thompson discuss Meanjin and the role of editors in forging a publication’s identity. I was very interested in Christina‘s discussion of her work at the Harvard Review and the positioning of the Review in a digital age. I noted the importance Christina attached to Laura Healy‘s work with the Review’s website (see too Laura’s Chocolog site).

Just as I was savouring these thoughts, Colm Toibin appeared on the same Radio National program to discuss his Off the Shelf books (Off the Shelf is a regular segment on the Book Show where writers and artists talk about a book or books that have influenced their thinking, or one that they go back to for inspiration). His discussion of Ernest Hemmingway’s The Sun Also Rises and A Moveable Feast explored the art of writing. (James Topham said of the A Moveable Feast “I think there is no author that makes you want to write than Hemingway; every sentence he writes seem to suggest a joy and delight in his craft”.)

I am looking forward to the joy and craft of writing this week.

Photo Credits

Writing Home 1914

D’Aug Days


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Sport n.0: Connecting Social Networks

Last year I wrote a paper for a special edition (Multimedia, the World Wide Web and eLearning in Sport) of the International Journal of Computer Science in Sport. The paper was rejected by a number of referees. The rejection was a salutary experience for me.

I wrote the paper in the afterglow of the remarkable CCK08 on line course. I was enchanted (and remain so) about the possibilities of connected groups and the opportunities that arise from sharing openly with colleagues whose work resonates with one’s own work and thoughts. The paper seemed a great way to share some of these experiences.

Two events have prompted me to revisit the rejected paper this week:

1. News that Facebook has 500 million users and that “more than a third of those who use the internet worldwide sign in to Facebook to update their status or post photos”.

2. Stephen Downes’ discussion of the xWeb as “the utilization of smart, structured data drawn from our physical and virtual interactions and identities to extend our capacity to be known by others and by systems.”

The paper is titled Sport n.0: Connecting Social Networks

Abstract

This paper discusses a connectivist approach to the development of social networks in computer science in sport. Social networks have used Web 2.0 tools to grow their connections and the prospects for a Semantic Web 3.0 present enormous opportunities for all of us in our personal and professional lives. This paper uses the concept of Sport n.0 to explore how each of us in the computer science in sport community can grow our interconnections through the use of social media. A case study of the development of one social network site is presented as a heuristic to explore possibilities for connectedness. The paper concludes that a move to open access is a key to the sustainability of the International Association of Computer Science in Sport and the flourishing of the International Journal of Computer Science in Sport.

Keywords: sport n.0,  Connectivism, social networks, social media, open access
Social Networks

In this paper I explore the social network possibilities open to communities of practice in computer science in sport. The paper is an exhortation to invest energy to create and develop open networks that share insights, knowledge and experiences that transcend language, geographical space and synchronous time.

Alexandra Marin and Barry Wellman (2009) point out that “social life is created primarily and most importantly by relations and the patterns formed by these relations. Social networks are formally defined as a set of nodes (or network members) that are tied by one or more types of relations”.  George Siemens (2008a) notes that “the advancements of the last several decades have made networks of learning explicit. Networks are reflected not only as physical information communication technologies, but as the very means through which knowledge is distributed for addressing complex challenges”.

Jane Hart (2009) has done a great deal to promote and support social learning. She suggests that “Social Learning can create more powerful and enduring learning experiences through the use of online communities and networks, where learners are encouraged to co-create, collaborate and share knowledge and fully participate in their learning”. Stephen Downes (2006) has argued that “theorists will have to, like students, immerse themselves in their field, to encounter and engage in a myriad of connections, to immerse themselves, as McLuhan would say, as though in a warm bath. But it’s a new world in here, and the water’s fine”.

This paper proposes that the computer science community immerse itself in social networks to engage theorists and practitioners in a discourse enriched by the possibilities of a Sport n.0. We are in an age of digital scholarship.

Digital Scholarship

Nancy Maron and Kirby Smith (2009) point out that this is an age of digital scholarship and observe that “as electronic resources for scholarship proliferate, more and more scholars turn to their computers rather than to print sources to conduct their research. While society journals, university presses, and conference proceedings still form the backbone of the scholarly publishing enterprise, alongside them many new digital scholarly resources have appeared, sprouting up wherever there is a devoted individual or team of scholars willing to create and nurture them”. Tony Bates (2009) considers that this digital scholarship is ‘embedded’ digital literacy and observes that “to be a scholar now means knowing how to find, analyse, organise and apply digital information. Studying without the use of technology is increasingly like learning to dive without water”. Rob Fitzgerald et al (2009) report the development of digital learning communities that are built by “an exploratory conversation between students, teachers, texts and technologies and that this is so whether learning is happening in the school, university, workplace, classroom, laboratory, or field”.

In the call for papers for this special edition (Multimedia, the World Wide Web and e-learning in Sport) of the International Journal of Computer Science in Sport (IJCSS), Larry Katz and Christoph Igel observed that: “We are interested in papers that explore the innovative use of these tools and their effectiveness in improving learning and performance”.  The call was contained in a PDF document and shared inter alia with the International Association of Computer Science in Sport’s listserv by email.

Larry Katz is a professor at the University of Calgary. Andrew Waller and Mary Westell (2009) report that the University of Calgary has had an Open Access Repository since 2003 that contains “citations for over 14,000 items, approximately 9,000 of which connect directly to full text. Material types include journal articles, reports of many different sorts, datasets, and theses and dissertations”.  Christoph Igel’s work at the Universitat  des Saarlands has been recognised with the award of the Chief Learning Officer 2009 for his work in the development of virtual learning and sharing communities.

In the context of the IJCSS call for papers it is interesting that a special edition on multimedia should be published in a conventional forum that limits the media that can be used and shared. This paper is a plea for a move to open access publishing and the transformation of intellectual property using Creative Commons approaches to community development as exemplified in the success of the Journal of Medical Internet Research (Gunther Eysenbach, 2009). It is a plea too to welcome and value the work of people like Brewster Kahle and John Willinsky.

Alex Wright (2007) points out that “ever since the Web first started to flicker across the world’s computer screens, we have seen a bull market in hyperbole about the digital age”. This paper celebrates that social networks are human networks and that there is an evident need to balance claims made for digital networks with the personal interactions each of us has in our daily lives (see Photograph 1).



Photograph 1: IACSS Dagstuhl Workshop, September 2006

Sport n.0

Many commentators locate the development of social networks and digital scholarship in terms of the n.0 characteristics the worldwide web. Wikipedia provides a brief account of Web 1.0 and a much more detailed account of Web 2.0. More recently Greg Boutin (2009a; 2009b; 2009c) has been exploring the characteristics of Web 3.0.  The European Future Internet Portal has shared a video about Web 3.0 and points out that 3.0 characteristics include: “an Internet of Services, where services are ubiquitous; an Internet of Things where in principle every physical object becomes an online addressable resource; a Mobile Internet where 24/7 seamless connectivity over multiple devices is the norm; and the need for semantics in order to meet the challenges presented by the dramatic increase in the scale of content and users”.

It is interesting to note that when the Information Architects’ blog (2007) discussed Web n.0 to visualise Web trends (see Visualisation 1), the authors observed that “we have added a Web Generation number … please note that there are some websites that are Web 1.5, some that are 2.5, and some that are 0.5. This is not a mistake. Web 2.5 is what Facebook is up to… The Generation number is not necessarily qualifying, but it’s not surprising that websites that do well are usually above 1.0; some of them (like eBay and Wikipedia) were 2.0 long before the term was coined”.

Visualisation 1: Web Trends Map 2007/V2

This visualisation locates the 200 most successful 2007 websites on the Tokyo Metro Map, ordered by category, proximity, success, popularity and perspective. A trendmap for 2009 is available.

The potential of these n.0 changes for our communities of practice in sport is enormous and has been exemplified in Larry Katz’s Sports Technology Research Laboratory and Christoph Igel’s e-learning work. My own approach to developments in Sport n.0 were shared earlier this year with delegates at the Thirteenth World Congress of the International Association for Sports Information and in a SlideShare presentation about Institute 4.0.  Mills Davis (2009) has discussed four types of web: 1.0 the Web (connects information); 2.0 the Social Web (connects people);  3.0 the Semantic Web (connects knowledge); and web 4.0 the Ubiquitous Web (connects intelligence). In the 4.0 space there will be “agent webs that know, learn and reason as humans do”.

Social Media

A report by the Smart Services CRC (2009) defines social media as “websites which build on Web 2.0 technologies to provide space for in-depth social interaction, community formation, and the tackling of collaborative projects”. There has been a proliferation of these media in recent years.

As each of us explores these social media we have the opportunity to learn with and from others. Wikis have proven to be a powerful medium for sharing. An excellent example of what is possible is demonstrated in the Connectivism and Connective Knowledge CCK08 course wiki and in work by such people as Leigh Blackall (2009).

The aggregation of our experiences through wikis offers enormous opportunities to grow communities. Gene Schembri (2008) has provided an interesting example of how a wiki can be used to support  learning communities in sport. He observes that wikis enable people to: share information; discuss a topic and invite comment on it; provide open access to upload and share resources;  and provide opportunities to edit material to ensure that content is current and accurate. Most wikis allow authors to create content without a knowledge of mark up language. Sue Vesper (2009) provides some interesting background information about wikis for those keen to explore their use.

There are some fascinating projects underway to explore social media. Howard Rheingold’s work with the Social Media Classroom (2009) aims to “grow a public resource of knowledge and relationships among all who are interested in the use of social media in learning, and therefore, it is made public with the intention of growing a community of participants who will take over its provisioning, governance and future evolution”. Michael Wesch (2008) and his students at Kansas State University are exploring digital ethnography. Michael Wesch’s video The Machine is Us/ing Us (2007) has been viewed almost ten million times on YouTube, it has over 21,000 ratings and 8,000 comments.

In 2008 a massive, open, online Connectivism course demonstrated how Sport n.0 might use social media to link and grow its communities of practice. This course,  Connectivism and Connective Knowledge (CCK08), is the subject of the next part of this paper.

Connectivism

In 2004 George Siemens proposed that “Connectivism presents a model of learning that acknowledges the tectonic shifts in society where learning is no longer an internal, individualistic activity. How people work and function is altered when new tools are utilized”. His identification of Connectivism as a learning theory for the Digital Age has stimulated enormous interest and discussion. A community keen to explore his ideas came together for the Connectivism and Connective Knowledge (CCK08) in the second half of 2008.

Principles of Connectivism identified by George Siemens (2004) that underpinned the CCK08 course were:

  • Learning and knowledge rest in a diversity of opinions.
  • Learning is a process of connecting specialised nodes or information sources.
  • Learning may reside in non-human appliances.
  • Capacity to know more is more critical than what is currently known.
  • Nurturing and maintaining connections is needed to facilitate continual learning.
  • Ability to see connections between fields, ideas, and concepts is a core skill.
  • Accurate, up-to-date knowledge is the intent of all connectivist learning activities.
  • Decision-making is itself a learning process. Choosing what to learn and the meaning of incoming information is seen through the lens of a shifting reality.

George Siemens (2009) has provided a comparison of learning theories to locate the distinctiveness of Connectivism. This comparison is presented in Table 1.

Table 1: A comparison of learning theories

CCK08 provided a forum to explore, discuss and debate Connectivism and I believe the model has enormous possibilities for communities of practice in computer science in sport. The structure of the course was:

  • Each week had a clearly defined topic.
  • The topic was introduced by a short article or introduction or podcast.
  • Links to external resources for additional reading/viewing were provided weekly.
  • Short podcasts and opinion pieces explored disagreements.
  • Discussions were held in asynchronous forums like blogs, Moodle, and wikis. The course code (CCK08) was used for tagging posts or sharing del.icio.us resources.
  • Assignments and activities for participants who enrolled “for-credit” were required for completion/reflection on a weekly basis.
  • Weekly live lectures and presentations were held. These lectures were delivered in Elluminate, UStream TV and BlipTV and were recorded for participants in different time zones.
  • Guest presenters were involved throughout the course.
  • Mind maps of key discussion topics were co-created with participants at the conclusion of each week.
  • The time required by learners was a minimum of five hours per week (reading, assignments, etc) and a maximum of ten to fifteen hours (depending on learners’ expertise with online environments and familiarity with subject matter).

At the end of the course George Siemens (2009b) summarised his involvement as a course facilitator: “I have spend a minimum of 12 hours per week on CCK08. Some weeks, especially at the start, were likely closer to about 30 hours”.

The pattern of George’s time included:

  • Contributions to The Daily: 3-5 hours a week (reading posts and writing commentary)
  • Reading Moodle forum contributions: 5-7 hours a week (reading and posting)
  • Recording/wrapup/introduction for the next week: from zero hours some weeks to 2 hours others
  • Live sessions: 3+ hours (Elluminate and UStream sessions)
  • Responding to email: 2-5 hours a week
  • Marking papers: approximately 1 hour min per paper (reading, reflecting, and trying to write something coherent and hopefully of value to the participants). Total marking time for the course: more than 75 hours
  • Course preparation time: 60-80 hours

Overall George estimated that the total time he spent on the CCK08 course was between 375-425 hours.

There are many communities that have flourished as a result of the CCK08 course. Stephen Downes (2009a) has provided an overview of the course and its open access potential.

The CCK08 course was an excellent case study of Nancy White (2009)  Communities of Practice. These communities have nine facets:

  • Meetings – in person or online gatherings with an agenda.
  • Projects – interrelated tasks with specific outcomes or products.
  • Access to expertise – learning from experienced practitioners.
  • Relationship – getting to know each other.
  • Context – internally-focused or serving the wider world.
  • Community cultivation – recruiting, orienting and supporting members, growing the community.
  • Individual participation – enabling members to craft their own experience of the community.
  • Content – a focus on capturing and publishing what the community learns and knows.
  • Open ended conversation – conversations that continue to rise and fall over time without a specific goal.

I believe the CCK08 is an important model for developments within the computer science in sport community. Its use of social media has enormous implications for the way knowledge sharing communities are supported and sustained. Importantly Connectivism acknowledges the place personal learning environments have in this process. The CCK08 course led to an incandescence of activity and a flourishing of social networks. The Daily produced during the course gives a feel for the digital scholarship stimulated by the course. Two examples of community building projects that arose from the course include Digifolios and Personal Learning Spaces and Connectivism, Technology, Web 2.0.

Stephen Downes (2009b) argues that “the first phase of educational media was focused almost entirely toward learning management”. Social media have made a second phase possible. Stephen Downes characterises this phase as the personal learning environment (PLE). Tony Hirst (2009) explores some of the possibilities for PLEs in a time of “radical syndication” and “the uncourse attitude”. His work demonstrates some of the ways in which content can be packaged, bundled, unbundled, mixed, remixed, contextualised, commented upon and scheduled for delivery using freely available web tools and techniques that do not need a programmer to operate them. The United Kingdom’s Open University Platform (2008) is an excellent example of this approach as is a web site that addresses the mashable (2009) affordances of digital media.

IACSS09

My involvement in the CCK08 course accelerated and focused my interest in social networks. During the course I used a range of social media to explore collaborative learning. I invested considerable energy in developing my blog Clyde Street and as part of the CCK08 course I posted each week and commented on colleagues’ blog posts. Visualisation 2 plots the increased readership of the blog since its inception in June 2008.

Visualisation 2: Clyde Street views per month

Clyde Street attracted its highest monthly readership during March 2009. This coincided with two conferences at which I blogged live. One was the International Association of Sports Information 13th World Congress in Canberra. The other was the National Library of Australia’s Innovative Ideas Forum 2009 also in Canberra.

Live blogging provides an opportunity to share presentations with colleagues within Australia and around the world. It offers an almost synchronous sharing opportunity as well as an asynchronous record for colleagues in different time zones. Microblogging services such as Twitter are now offering real time sharing of information in 140 character blocks of text.

My experience in CCK08 encouraged me to develop a Ning site for the IACSS09 Symposium to be held in Canberra.

The aim of this site was to build a social network around the work of IACSS and to create a pre-conference connection between delegates and organisers. It was defined as an unofficial site to avoid any confusion with the official Symposium site.

The Ning site was launched in December 2008 and one of the strong reasons for using the Ning suite of tools was its language potential. Ning offers the opportunity to use twenty-three languages on the site. The Language Editor page provides information about this functionality. Importantly it is possible to import language files from other Ning sites. My hope was that this agnostic feature would stimulate exchanges in a variety of languages (see Visualisation 3).

Visualisation 3: An example of four languages for upload to the site

One of the options available to Ning sites is to have an advert free skin and I chose this option (for a small monthly fee) to ensure that IACSS was not seen to be supporting any commercial activity by a third party over which IACSS had no control.

In December 2008, I started sending out invitations to join the Ning site. This was an important step as I was able to moderate all membership uptake to ensure  that there was no abuse of the site by uninvited third parties. Once a member was approved that member had full access to the site’s functions. Importantly the site does not require mark up language. At the time of writing this paper there are forty-seven members. Each of these members has the freedom to:

  • Add a blog post
  • Start a discussion topic
  • Create an event
  • Add music
  • Upload photographs
  • Upload video
  • Write a note
  • Invite a friend to join the site

These functions are located on one site and remove the necessity to use multiple sites for the social network.

The CCK08 course discussed earlier in this paper demonstrated the potential of social media to grow networks linked by mutual interest. The IACSS09 Ning site is an example of a connectivist approach to social network development in computer science in sport. At present it awaits examples of non-English language use. The next step is to encourage drivers from IACSS to initiate this multi-lingual exchange.

I believe this kind of exchange can lead to the production of remarkable open access materials. I conclude this paper with a brief discussion of open access publication as the logical outcome of a commitment to Connectivism, Sport n.0 and social networks.

Open Access

Lee Orsdel and Kathleen Born (2009) provide a detailed overview of the impact of the global 2008 financial crisis on library budgets. They report that “In an unprecedented move, the International Coalition of Library Consortia issued a statement to publishers in January warning that double-digit budget cuts over the next few years are expected and calling for creative strategies from publishers who want to keep their business. The Association of Research Libraries followed with its own statement in February, underscoring the need for publishers to take this crisis seriously”.

This financial crisis is occurring at a time when the impact of Open Access journals is growing (Shu-Kun Lin, 2009). It is occurring at a time when there are increasing calls for and commitments to Open Access in universities such as Harvard, the Universite de Geneve, and Roehampton. It is occurring at a time too when the Public Knowledge Project (2009) is growing its reach as is the Internet Archive. It is occurring at a time when there is increasing discussion of the Edgeless University (Peter Bradwell, 2009) in which “technology is changing universities as they become just one source among many for ideas, knowledge and innovation. But online tools and open access also offer the means for their survival. Through their institutional capital, universities can use technology to offer more flexible provision and open more equal routes to higher education and learning”.

Matt Wedel (2009) has raised some fascinating issues in relation to the links between published articles in peer review journals and the posts written in blogs. He draws attention to what he calls the Intolerable Problem: “which is that people online can critique papers and present new evidence and arguments in a format that is impermanent and not peer-reviewed. It’s intolerable because on one hand such material is not currently (operative word) citable in most outlets, and on the other hand repeating it sans citation in peer-reviewed literature smacks of plagiarism (to some, but not to all)”.

When I first contemplated writing this paper I posted my thoughts online in this post.  I received two responses about the principle of sharing a paper on line. Both responses encouraged me to contemplate what a collaborative paper might look like. I do find myself attracted to Matt Wedel’s (2009) argument that “I still think that the investment of blog posts with respectability, value, citability, or whatever rests entirely with readers, and always will. Options range from treating posts like papers to treating them like bar conversations to treating them like spam. You decide”. The availability of WebCite functionality will transform this debate: “a WebCite®-enhanced reference is a reference which contains – in addition to the original live URL (which can and probably will disappear in the future, or its content may change) – a link to an archived copy of the material, exactly as the citing author saw it when he accessed the cited material”.

If accepted for publication this paper will appear in 2010. In order to retain some currency I have chosen to use references mainly from 2009 in the drafting of this paper. By the time the special edition of IJCC on multimedia appears we will have had the Seventh IACSS Symposium. At this Symposium it is intended to use as many of the social network tools available to connect delegates in novel ways that are appearing elsewhere. As IACSS develops its own Symposia formats it will be interesting to see how these formats resonate with those organised by CERN (2009) and AACE (2009) amongst others.

It is a most remarkable time of change in the ways we communicate.

References

Bates, T. (2009). e-Learning and 21st century skills and competences. Journal Article (On-line/Unpaginated) http://www.tonybates.ca/2009/06/24/e-learning-and-21st-century-skills-and-competences/ accessed 29 June 2009.

Blackall, L. (2009). Composing educational resources. (Wikieducator wiki)

http://wikieducator.org/Composing_educational_resources accessed 29 June 2009.

Boutin, G. (2009a). Tying Web 3.0, The Semantic Web And Linked Data Together — Part 1/3: Web 3.0 Will Not Solve Information Overload. Article (On-line/Unpaginated) http://www.semanticsincorporated.com/2009/05/tying-web-30-the-semantic-web-and-linked-data-together-part-13-web-30-will-not-solve-information-ove.html accessed 29 June 2009.

Boutin, G. (2009b). Tying Web 3.0, The Semantic Web And Linked Data Together – Part 2/3: Linked Data Is A Medium. Article (On-line/Unpaginated) http://www.semanticsincorporated.com/2009/05/tying-web-30-the-semantic-web-and-linked-data-together-part-23-linked-data-is-a-medium.html accessed 29 June 2009.

Boutin, G. (2009c). Tying Web 3.0, The Semantic Web And Linked Data Together – Part 3/3: Structuring Chaos. Article (On-line/Unpaginated) http://www.semanticsincorporated.com/2009/05/tying-web-30-the-semantic-web-and-linked-data-together-part-33-structuring-chaos-.html accessed 29 June 2009.

Bradwell, P. (2009). The Edgeless University. London: Demos. http://www.demos.co.uk/files/Edgeless_University_-_web.pdf?1245715615 accessed 29 June 2009.

Davis, M. (2009). Web3 And The Next Internet – New Direction and Opportunities for STM Publishing. SlideShare Presentation http://www.slideshare.net/Mills/web3-and-the-next-internet-new-directions-and-opportunities-for-stm-publishing-davis-2009-web?src=embed accessed 29 June 2009.

Downes, S. (2009a). Access2OER: The CCK08 Solution. Journal article (On-line/Unpaginated) http://halfanhour.blogspot.com/2009/02/access2oer-cck08-solution.html accessed 29 June 2009.

Downes, S. (2009b). Beyond Management: The Personal Learning Environment. Keynote address EdMedia World Conference, Hawaii, June 2009 http://www.aace.org/conf/edmedia/speakers/downes.htm accessed 29 June 2009.

Downes, S. (2006). Learning Networks and Connective Knowledge. Journal article (On-line/Unpaginated) http://it.coe.uga.edu/itforum/paper92/paper92.html accessed 29 June 2009.

Eysenbach, G. (2009). Open Access journal JMIR rises to top of its discipline. Journal article (On-line/Unpaginated) http://gunther-eysenbach.blogspot.com/2009/06/open-access-journal-jmir-rises-to-top.html accessed 29 June 2009.

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Hart, J. (2009). What is Social Learning? SlideShare presentation http://www.c4lpt.co.uk/sociallearning/sociallearning.html accessed 29 June 2009.

Hirst, T. (2009). They Put Silage in Silos, Don’t They? So Feed Me. Invited paper EdMedia World Conference, Hawaii, June 2009 http://www.aace.org/conf/edmedia/speakers/hirst.htm accessed 29 June 2009.

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Information Architect Blog (2007). Web Trend Map 2007 Version 2.0. Article (On-line/Unpaginated) http://informationarchitects.jp/ia-trendmap-2007v2/ accessed 29 June 2009.

Lin, S-K (2009). Full Open Access Journals Have Increased Impact Factors. Molecules 2009, 14(6), 2254-2255 http://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/14/6/2254/ accessed 29 June 2009.

Lyons, K. (2009). A Fourth Age of Sports Institutes. SlideShare presentation http://www.slideshare.net/Postillion/a-fourth-age-of-sports-institutes accessed 29 June 2009.

Lyons, K. (2008). IASI in Canberra. Article (On-line/Unpaginated) https://keithlyons.wordpress.com/2008/08/12/iasi-in-canberra-2009/ accessed 29 June 2009.

Marin, A. & Wellman, B. (2009). Social Network Analysis: An Introduction. Book Chapter (forthcoming) http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman/publications/newbies/newbies.pdf accessed 29 June 2009.

Maron, N. & Smith. K. (2009). Current Models of Digital Scholarly Communication: Results of an Investigation Conducted by Ithaka Strategic Services for the Association of Research Libraries. Ann Arbor, MI: Scholarly Publishing Office, University of Michigan, University Library vol. 12, no. 1, February 2009 http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=jep;cc=jep;rgn=main;view=text;idno=3336451.0012.105 accessed 29 June 2009.

Orsdel, L. & Born, K. (2009). Reality Bites: Periodicals Price Survey 2009. Journal Article (On-line/Unpaginated) http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6651248.html accessed 29 June 2009.

Rheingold, H. (2009). Social Media Classroom/ Co-laboratory. Screencast http://vlog.rheingold.com/index.php/site/video/social-media-classroom-co-laboratory-screencast1/ accessed 29 June 2009.

Schembri, G. (2008). Wiki http://ncodmelb.wikispaces.com/ accessed 29 June 2009.

Siemens, G. (2009).  What is Connectivism? Week 1:CCK08. Article (On-line/Unpaginated) http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=anw8wkk6fjc_14gpbqc2dt accessed 29 June 2009.

Siemens, G. (2008a). A Brief History of Networked Learning. Article (On-line/Unpaginated) http://ltc.umanitoba.ca/wiki/Connectivism#Week_4:_History_of_networked_learning_.28September_29-October_5.29 accessed 29 June 2009.

Siemens, G. (2008b). Who is still participating? Article (On-line/Unpaginated) http://ltc.umanitoba.ca/connectivism/?p=182 accessed 29 June 2009.

Siemens, G. (2004).  Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age. Article (On-line/Unpaginated) http://www.elearnspace.org/Articles/connectivism.htm accessed 29 June 2009.

Smart Internet CRC (2009). Social Media State of the Art. Australia: Smart Internet CRC. http://produsage.org/files/Social%20Media%20-%20State%20of%20the%20Art%20-%20March%202009.pdf accessed 29 June 2009.

Vesper, S. (2009). Wikis Overview. Wiki http://learningweb2.wikispaces.com/Wikis+Overview accessed 29 June 2009.

Waller, A. & Westell, M. (2009). Open Access initiatives at the University of Calgary. Letter of the LAA, 2009, n. 163. [Journal Article (On-line/Unpaginated) http://eprints.rclis.org/16329/ accessed 20 June 2009

Wedel, M. (2009). Blogs, papers and the brave new digital world.: Matt’s thoughts. Article (On-line/Unpaginated) http://svpow.wordpress.com/2009/06/11/blogs-papers-and-the-brave-new-digital-world-matts-thoughts/ accessed 29 June 2009.

Wesch, M. (2008). An anthropological introduction to YouTube, YouTube video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPAO-lZ4_hU accessed 29 June 2009.

Wesch, M. (2007).  Web 2.0 … The Machine is Us/ing Us. You Tube video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6gmP4nk0EOE&feature=channel accessed 29 June 2009.

White, N. (2009). Red-Tails in Love: Birdwatchers as a community of practice. Article (On-line/Unpaginated) http://technologyforcommunities.com/2009/03/red-tails-in-love-birdwatchers-as-a-community-of-practice/ accessed 29 June 2009.

Wright, A. (2007). Glut: Mastering Information Through the Ages. Washington: National Academies Press.


Hyperlinks

Social networks

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_networks

IACSS

http://www.iacss.org/index.php?id=29

IJCC

http://www.iacss.org/index.php?id=30

Larry Katz

http://www.strc.ucalgary.ca/katz/index.html

Christoph Igel

http://www.sportwissenschaft.de/index.php?id=275

PDF

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PDF

Email

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Email

University of Calgary

http://www.ucalgary.ca/

Universitat des Saarlands

http://www.uni-saarland.de/index.php

Chief Learning Officer Award

http://www.uni-saarland.de/campus/fakultaeten/zentrale-einrichtungen/competence-center-virtuelle-saar-universitaet/aktuelles/1-preis-clo.html

Creative Commons

http://creativecommons.org/

Creative Commons video

http://creativecommons.org/videos/a-shared-culture/

Brewster Kahle

http://www.archive.org/about/bios.php#brewster

John Willinsky

http://pkp.sfu.ca/history

Worldwide Web

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Internet

Wikipedia

http://www.wikipedia.org/

Web 1.0

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_1.0

Web 2.0

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_2.0

European Future Internet Portal

http://www.future-internet.eu/home.html

European Future Internet Portal video

http://www.future-internet.eu/publications/media.html#c140

Sports Technology Research Labratory

http://www.strc.ucalgary.ca/index.html

Competence Center Virtuelle

http://www.uni-saarland.de/campus/fakultaeten/zentrale-einrichtungen/competence-center-virtuelle-saar-universitaet.html

IASI Congress

https://secure.ausport.gov.au/conferences/iasi

Wiki

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiki

CCK08

http://ltc.umanitoba.ca/connectivism/

Social Media Classroom

http://www.socialmediaclassroom.com/

Digital Ethnography, Kansas State University

http://mediatedcultures.net/ksudigg/

CCK08 Google Tag

http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=CCK08+tag&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

CCK08 del.icio.us Tag

http://delicious.com/tag/cck08

Elluminate

http://www.elluminate.com/

Ustream TV

http://www.ustream.tv/

Blip TV

http://blip.tv/

The Daily

http://connect.downes.ca/

CCK08 Moodle

http://ltc.umanitoba.ca/moodle/course/view.php?id=20

Digifolios

http://digifolios.ning.com/

Connectivism, Education and Learning

http://connectivismeducationlearning.ning.com/

Open University Platform

http://ouseful.wordpress.com/2008/11/28/ou-goes-social-with-platform/

Mashable

http://mashable.com/

Clyde Street

https://keithlyons.wordpress.com/

Innovative Ideas 09 Forum

http://www.nla.gov.au/initiatives/meetings/innovative-ideas-forum/2009/

Twitter

http://twitter.com

IACSS09 Ning Site

http://iacss09.ning.com/

Ning Language Editor

http://iacss09.ning.com/main/language/list

Ning Import Language File

http://iacss09.ning.com/main/language/upload

IACSS09 Ning Membership

http://iacss09.ning.com/profiles/members/

International Coalition of Library Consortia

http://www.library.yale.edu/consortia/

International Coalition of Library Consortia Statement

http://www.library.yale.edu/consortia/icolc-econcrisis-0109.htm

Association of Research libraries

http://www.arl.org/

Harvard Press Statement

http://www.gse.harvard.edu/blog/news_features_releases/2009/06/harvard-graduate-school-of-education-votes-open-access-policy.html

Universite de Geneve Statement

http://archive-ouverte.unige.ch/outils/Directive_Archive_ouverte_UNIGE.pdf

Roejhampton University Statement

http://www.eprints.org/openaccess/policysignup/fullinfo.php?inst=Roehampton University

Public Knowledge Project

http://pkp.sfu.ca/about

Internet Archive

http://www.archive.org/index.php

Ning paper alert

http://iacss09.ning.com/profiles/blogs/open-and-connected-communities

WebCite

http://www.webcitation.org/

WebCite Enhanced Reference

http://www.webcitation.org/#How_look

CERN (2009)

http://indico.cern.ch/conferenceDisplay.py?confId=48321

AACE (2009)

http://www.aace.org/conf/edMedia/


3 Comments

#HPRW10 Sharing

I have been thinking about a framework for my panel contribution at Day Three of #HPRW10.The topic for the panel to address is How do we make the research effort into high performance sport more effective?

The abstract I submitted was:

There is a wonderful momentum growing around the aggregation of effort in many aspects of social and professional life. Following on from my presentation at the NESC Forum 2009 I am going to propose that a connected network of practice is essential for sport to flourish in Australia. This connected network will be open and through aggregation will ensure that we grow a research culture that has a cumulative approach to knowledge production. For this to be really effective it will require many institutions to transform their Internet presence. I will suggest there is no wealth but life.

The resources I have looked at to develop my thoughts are:

Around the World in Eighty Seconds

(London – Cairo – Mumbai – Hong Kong – Tokyo – San Francisco – New York – London)

Social Media 2

I was struck by a recent post by Seth Godin in which he argued that:

The challenge of our time may be to build organizations and platforms that  engage and coordinate the elites, wherever they are. After all, this is where change and productivity come from.
Once you identify this as your mission, you save a lot of time and frustration in your outreach. If someone doesn’t choose to be part of the elites, it’s unclear to me that you can persuade them to change their mind. On the other hand, the cycle of discovery and engagement the elites have started is going to accelerate over time, and you have all the tools necessary to be part of it – to lead it, in fact. (Original emphasis.)

I looked at a link I received to Virtual Research Networks

and pondered the possibilities of Web 3.0. Whilst doing so I found Kate Ray’s link to a discussion of the Semantic Web (link).

Which led me to this Flickr phtograph of Tim Berners-Lee.

I followed up his Linked Data Presentation just as I received an invitation to a webinar about the Semantic Enterprise. The trail for the webinar identified Four Pillars of the Advanced Computing Enterprise

  • Data management
  • Process management
  • Access management
  • Resource management

The value proposition from the trail was that semantics help adapt and unify databases, web services and service oriented architectures (SOA), mobile devices, and cloud computing.

From other feeds I have been contemplating social media and connectedness.

Social Media: Twitter

Social Media: Facebook

Changes to Facebook’s privacy settings have been creating some very strong responses. Recent examples include Jason Calcanis’s post (12 May) and a New York Times article (11 May).

(Postscript After finishing this post I came across Mark Pesce’s article for the ABC’s  Drum Unleashed Social networks and the end of privacy. I include it here as an important contribution to the discussion of privacy. See too Stephen Downes’ (18 May) detailed special report Facebook and Privacy. Scholarly Kitchen has compiled some resources on this topic too.)

Meanwhile a colleague had shared with me a paper by James E. Powell, Linn Marks Collins, and Mark L.B. Martinez (2009), in which they observe:

We believe that high quality custom collections of content from digital libraries, and the ability to explore it, can be critically important to decision makers and first responders dealing with crises.  These collections become even more valuable when offered with tools enabled by semantic technologies.  These tools can facilitate visual and task-based exploration of the collection, and provide Web 2.0 collaboration capabilities such as sharing, commenting, rating, and tagging, which are typical of online journal clubs.

Their work set me off on an open access track that took me to Sesame (an open source Java framework for storing, querying and reasoning with RDF and RDF Schema).

Thereafter, I pursued:

The Fierce Urgency of Now, in which it is proposed that:

proactive information retrieval tools can play a significant role in information seeking for users in some situations, in particular those where it is important to quickly get a sense of what information might be available about a particular topic. This may be particularly true if a user is focused on a task that benefits from information, but is not itself an information-seeking task. Additionally, the urgency of a particular task may also make it a requirement that the user be made aware of information, rather than be forced to search for it.

I followed a steer from the authors of that paper and found Michael Twidale et al. (2007) Writing in the library: Exploring tighter integration of digital library use with the writing process. They argue that:

Information provision via digital libraries often separates the writing process from that of information searching. In this paper we investigate the potential of a tighter integration between searching for information in digital libraries and using those results in academic writing. We consider whether it may sometimes be advantageous to encourage searching while writing instead of the more conventional approach of searching first and then writing. The provision of ambient search is explored, taking the user’s ongoing writing as a source for the generation of search terms used to provide possibly useful results. A rapid prototyping approach exploiting web services was used as a way to explore the design space and to have working demonstrations that can provoke reactions, design suggestions and discussions about desirable functionalities and interfaces. This design process and some preliminary user studies are described. The results of these studies lead to a consideration of issues arising in exploring this design space, including handling irrelevant results and the particular challenges of evaluation.

Whilst reading that paper on-line I received a tweet from Radio National about its Future Tense program on the digital classroom in Australia. I ended my day enjoying a blog from one of the people in that program, Helen Otway, Assistant Principal for ICT and Student Learning at Manor Lakes P-12 Specialist College.

Just as I was closing my computer I received a link to a YouTube video (two million views in a week) from a Listserv that ilustrated the excitement and dynamism available to us as we connect as researchers and coaches.

Photo Credits

Phone-wire tangle

Linked Data


1 Comment

Open Access and Sharing

Yesterday I posted news of the publication of the Proceedings of the Seventh Symposium of Computer Science in Sport. When I checked my WordPress Dashboard this morning I found this response to the post:

Overnight (in Australia) there were 200 visits to the post following an email alert earlier in the day. I have posted the Proceedings in Box.Net at this link and the Internet Archive at this link. To date there have been 20 downloads of the Proceedings from Box.Net and other downloads of SlideShare presentations.

By coincidence shortly after posting the Proceedings I received a request to provide an abstract for a Panel Discussion at the Australian Institute of Sport. The question I and several colleagues will address is ‘How can we optimise the research effort into high performance sport throughout the Australian network?’ This is my response:

There is a wonderful momentum growing around the aggregation of effort in many aspects of social and professional life. Following on from my presentation at the NESC Forum 2009 I am going to propose that a connected network of practice is essential for sport to flourish in Australia. This connected network will be open and through aggregation will ensure that we grow a research culture that has a cumulative approach to knowledge production. For this to be really effective it will require many institutions to transform their Internet presence. I will suggest there is no wealth but life .

The dynamic possibilities of online sharing enabled me to add an Addendum to the Proceedings this morning (a paper by Alexis Lebedew). Shortly after doing so I received an alert from the Scholarly Kitchen with Ann Michael’s post about the 2010 STM Spring Conference in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Ann reports that some common themes emerged:

  1. Librarians want to supply their users with content electronically and, more specifically, via mobile devices.  This is not limited to journals.  eBooks of both monographs and textbooks were also discussed.
  2. Librarians want all of these content forms at the same time.  They don’t want to wait for electronic versions.
  3. Tools provided to search library collections must be straight-forward and intuitive for users; training should not be required.
  4. However, training and preparation is needed in overall “information literacy.”  Especially at the undergraduate level, students need guidance in becoming discriminating consumers of content to develop the “mental maps” of context that help them to evaluate the quality of the content they come across.
  5. In relation to the academy, as budget pressures increase, the need to publish research is becoming more critical.  Research is an avenue to grants, contracts, and private donations. Since state funding is decreasing and tuition can only be raised so much, research-related sources of funding will be critical.
  6. Finally, several speakers raised the point that it’s very difficult to secure referees for the peer-review process.  Even authors who submit multiple papers often decline requests to review the work of others.

I should have been participating this week with 500 other colleagues in a delightful online course facilitated by Dave Cormier and George Siemens. The course resonates with so many of my interests:

Discussions and proclamations of the future of education, learning, training, and development are popular topics at conferences and in publications. For educators, leaders, and administrators, it’s easy to “get lost” in the numerous predictions. What is the next wave of technological change? Are learners really different today? Is our current model of education unsustainable? What can educators do to anticipate and respond to trends?

Unfortunately, predictions of the future are often more of a guessing game than a rigorous process. This course will utilize methods of futures thinking to explore a variety of trends and statistics and provide a series of potential scenarios and future directions. Participants will be actively involved in tracking critical trends, exploring their educational impact, and plan for ways to prepare for important changes.

In order to explore potential paths for education, learning, and training, we will spend time developing a framework for analyzing trends and for generating and evaluating scenarios.

The course will focus on developing methods and mechanisms for making sense of change patterns. Future-focused thinking is an important skill for all educators, leaders, and administrators. During the eight-weeks of this course, we will explore approaches to separating “the nonsense” from “the potential” proclamations of education’s future.

It has been quite a twenty-four hours. This week I am still dealing with my jet lag from my visit to the UK and so I have had some extra time to work on the web. The intensity of what happens in a global community underscores why connectivism is so important to emergent learning, open access and sharing.

Photo Credits

World Class Traffic Jam

Questions Answered


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Additional Resources for #IACSS09

I have been working on the Proceedings for the International Association of Computer Science in Sport’s Seventh Symposium held in Canberra in September 2009. There are a number of resources I want to add to the Symposium record and this post is a repository for some of these.

For those who would like a record of the Abstracts. These can be found in a Box.Net file share. This folder on Box.Net contains twenty-three PowerPoint presentations not included in the Symposium SlideShare collection.

I have included these abstracts and PowerPoint slides with the permission of the authors as a contribution to the development of open access resources for students of computer science in sport.

The proceedings with an ISBN will appear later this month as an electronic document shared openly with a global community of interested colleagues.

Photo Credits

What can be done with Flickr? Cogdogblog

Reading the TV Novels Summary Pedrosimoes7

Metallica at Rock Werchter 2009 Crsan