Clyde Street

Learning, Teaching, Performing


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#SCP12 The Power to Point

Today is delivery day for students taking part in the Sport Coaching Pedagogy unit at the University of Canberra.

They will be sharing their link to a presentation each of them has posted online.

I received an overnight flurry of links from the group.

Most have used SlideCasts in SlideShare, some have used Prezi, two have used Archive.org and there is one YouTube video.

The YouTube link created a teachable moment for me.

I was compiling the links to the presentations on the unit’s Wikiversity eportfolio page and was alerted to the YouTube link as spam. When Wikiversity drew my attention to this and that I could not save the page with the link in it I wondered if I had compromised the whole page.

Fortunately I had not but it reminded me of how much confidence one needs to build resources.

Today’s meeting in the unit is focusing on Produsage.

After reading Joseph Esposito’s Scholarly Kitchen post on skeuomorphic publishing I am starting my next phase of exploring the power to point to resources open for sharing and reshaping. Joseph concludes that:

What is missing, though, is an industry-wide commitment to think about new media as new media. Rather than contrast and compare it to print, we could be thinking about digital media’s unique properties.  We should not be replacing print collections with digital ones; we should be superseding them.

Photo Credit

Big Issue Seller


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Connecting, Sharing and Curating

The New Year has prompted a range of posts about trends in connecting, sharing and curating.

Some examples I have found in the last few days:

Stephen Downes linked to Nick DeNardis’s post Why now is a great time to do an OAuth audit. Nick points out that “The beginning of the year is a great opportunity to start fresh and look at everything with a new set of eyes. Something that is easily overlooked is who (or what) has access to your social media accounts. It’s easy to change your password and revoke access from co-workers but it isn’t as easy to identify which websites and services have access to your accounts.”

Alistair Gray shared a link with the International Sports Management LinkedIn Group to a Dan Schawbel discussion of optimising use of LinkedIn. Dan identifies two fundamental principles of networking in his conversation with Jan Vermeiren, the founder of Networking Coach: the networking attitude (give and receive); and the Know, Like, Trust factor.

A Diigo Teacher-Librarian Group link from a Scoop.it page to an Apollo Research Institute Report (April 2011) on Future Work Skills. The Report identified ten skills “vital for success in the workforce”:

  • Sense-making: an ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed
  • Social intelligence: an ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions
  • Novel and adaptive thinking: a proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based
  • Cross-cultural competency: an ability to operate in different cultural settings
  • Computational thinking: an ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning
  • New media literacy: an ability to assess critically and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication
  • Transdisciplinarity: literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines
  • Design mindset: an ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes
  • Cognitive load management: an ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques
  • Virtual collaboration: an ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team

Robin Good observes that:

By looking at the set of emerging skills that this research identifies as vital for future workers, I can’t avoid but recognize the very skillset needed by any professional curator or newsmaster.

This week’s presenter in the #change11 MOOC, Howard Rheingold has discussed five essential literacies:

I’ve concluded that one important step that people can take is to become more adept at five essential literacies for a world of mobile, social, and always-on media: attention, crap detection, participation, collaboration, and network know-how. The effects of these literacies can both empower the individuals who master them and improve the quality of the digital culture commons.

Stephen Downes shared a great link to Alec Couros’s end of year Social Media and Open Education blog post about student work. Alec notes that:

I wanted to use the last post of the year to share a few examples of the great work that is being done by my graduate and undergraduate students. I am so very fortunate to have creative & hard-working students who are committed to improving their knowledge of teaching and learning in light of our new digital landscape. I hope that some of these examples will inspire you to take up new challenges in your own context.

These examples included student projects using: stop-motion technique; Glogster; Freemind; Xtranormal; Screenr; Jing; Voicethread; TikaTok; Prezi; and Knovio.

SlideShare compiled 12 presentations that look at change in 2012. I was particularly interested in Skytide’s 7 Online Video Trends to Watch in 2012 and the discussion of Adaptive Bitrate Streaming. Skytide suggest “As adoption of adaptive bitrate protocols grows, providers of legacy streaming methods will find themselves under increased pressure to prove their added value. Witness the recent decision by Adobe to cease further development of its mobile FlashPlayer.”

I noted from an iSportConnect alert that the Philadelphia Wings Lacrosse team is using Twitter handles on its shirts (and following on a lead from two football teams (Valencia and Jaguares de Chiapas). Whilst looking at the Twitter possibilities I saw the Twitter blog post about New Year’s Eve activity. The post includes a video visualisation of tweets.

Phil Davis has written a post for The Scholarly Kitchen, Tweets and Our Obsession with Alt Metrics, that offers another perspective on tweeting. He discusses Gunther Eysenbach’s paper in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR), Can tweets predict citations? Metrics of social impact based on twitter and correlation with traditional metrics of scientific impact. The comments on this post make for fascinating reading and raise some salutary issues for me about connecting, sharing and curating.

I thought I would end this post with a link to Tagxedo. It is a word cloud generator and I have used it here to summarise the content of this post.

Photo Credits

Connecting

Share Your Ideas

Librarian Action Figure


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Mobile Presentation Ideas

Todd Ogasawara had an interesting post in Social Times last week.

His predicament:

  • I’m scheduled to make a presentation to a professional organization on Thursday afternoon.
  • The venue is a restaurant and doesn’t have a configuration appropriate for a traditional projector and screen arrangement.

His solution:

  • Upload my presentation to SlideShare.
  • Use Google’s URL shortener (goo.gl) to create a short URL that points to my presentation on SlideShare.
  • Add a “.qr” to the goo.gl’s shortened URL to create a QR code that will be printed on paper and scattered around the venue.
  • People with smartphones and tablets can point apps like Google Search at the QR code on the pieces of paper and be taken to my presentation.
  • SlideShare’s web presentation system recognizes mobile web browsers and lets people swipe through the slide deck.

By the time I read Todd’s post (via a Diigo Teacher-Librarian alert) there were a number of comments on the post:

Douglass Lodmell:

I think this is a great idea, however as with any kind of new technology, there is still room for error. What if the your phone dies while scanning the code that has your presentation on? What if there’s a malfunction or an error? I would tend to er on the side of caution and have a backup to scanning a QR code until the glitches are worked out.

LynxTo:

I’d say if you have any handouts, you might print a QR code on it that points to a mobile web page like ours and gives not only your Slideshare but a way to connect through social networks so people can follow your further musings as well.

Jan Wong:

I think this idea is gold. I’ve never thought of that before! Definitely a great workaround. Providing a URL would do the same but I guess it is cooler with a QR code.

Doug Ridley:

Neat idea, but why not just share the bit.ly link? That way no one is confused about what to do, and people without phones can access your slides on their computer or at home.

Hopkinsdavid:

Excellent idea and I would say pretty cetain to work (providing the audience knows what to do, has an app ready to scan the code, and the link directs to the mobile-version of the slideshare).

Todd responded to Jenny and Doug about the url:

Re: bit.ly link (or in this case goo.gl link). Yes, that makes sense for people carrying a 3G (no wifi in the venue either) enabled notebook. That can be printed right under the QRcode on pieces of paper passed around. However, I have seen a lot of people struggle to type in those short links.

Doug’s response:

That’s true, you might want to consider using a customer URL that isn’t case sensitive such as: http://tiny.cc/thispost

I have been following the use of QR codes for some time and was interested to read Todd’s post and the comments it generated. Adoption of QR codes does need helpful ‘How To’ posts.

In passing I wondered if for small venues and small groups some of the small lightweight portable projectors might be of use. I have been thinking about this for my meetings with coaches and athletes in impromptu settings when a teachable moment arises.

The technical specification for the 3M MP180 LED reports that:

  • It has wifi, bluetooth, powerpoint/pdf/ MS office viewers, 2 hour battery and a state-of-the-art touchscreen interface.
  • ‘No cables. No connections. Just freedom to present on the go’.
  • It includes a 3M Apple Cable (ipod, iphone, ipad) to connect to, and project from, these devices.
  • It offers 32 lumens of brightness, an 80″ (approx) screen size, 4gb onboard memory and SD card slot.
  • This projector has a 2 hour battery life which maintains the full brightness throughout.

This post’s QR Code is:


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Coaches and Technology

I am at the Japan Institute of Sports Sciences (JISS) in Tokyo. Today I hope to meet with some coaches at the Institute to discuss their use of technology. Chikara Miyaji is my host and I am hopeful that he will help me with the translation required for the conversation with coaches.

I have prepared a SlideShare for the discussions (a copy here 100927 Coaches and Technology) and I am hopeful that my use of photographs will unlock our shared understandings about coaching an performance. I do believe that whilst there are enormous cultural differences in coaching and athlete behaviour there are some fascinating cultural universals that bind coaches and athletes together in the world of sport.

The ideas I am sharing today are connected to this blog post (18 April 2010) written for colleagues at the Qatar Academy of Sport. I believe there are four key themes to address, coaches as:

  • Educational technologists
  • Users of commercial technologies
  • Users of free resources
  • Technology developers

I am interested to learn about how coaches undertake this work at JISS and the role that people like Chikara play in support of innovation and early adoption of technologies.

Photo Credit

Fritzi Scheff demonstrating Magnavox for Fifth Liberty Loan in New York City, 1895


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Cloud Computing and Ubiquitous Support for Coaches

I am attending the Asian Conference of Computer Science in Sports (ACCSS) in Tokyo later this week.The conference is being held at the Japan Institute of Sports Sciences.

I hope to blog live from the Conference to share the presentations and discussions.

This is a link to the Conference wiki. This is the draft program. I have submitted a paper for the Proceedings.

The abstract of my paper is:

Cloud computing is transforming the ways in which sport coaches work with athletes and enrich their own professional development. Cloud computing enables “convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction” (NIST, 2009). The pace of change in cloud computing is such that many coaches need access to and the support of educational technologists to manage their engagement with the opportunities the Internet provides. This paper presents examples of coaches’ use of cloud computing.  It explores how the openness of the cloud raises risk management issues for providers of institutional networks. The paper concludes with a discussion of the transformation of cloud resources by coaches through the use of iterative ‘good enough’ approaches to digital repositories (Lund, 2009).

References:

Lund, T.B. (2009). Standards and Interoperability. http://tinyurl.com/23r6ufp. Accessed 8 March 2010.

NIST (2009). NIST Definition of Cloud Computing v 15. http://tinyurl.com/22tuzrw. Accessed 8 March 2010.

This is a copy of my Slideshare presentation.


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Migratning IACSS09

In December 2008 I came across the social media service provided by Ning. I am always keen to explore the functionality of social media tools and signed up for a Premium Service account with Ning. This account provided an advert-clear skin for the site.

I thought I would use the IACSS09 conference as the focus of the Ning site. I have written about the site in a post titled Sport n.0: Connecting Social Networks.

I liked Ning’s mix of tools and thought they exemplified Clark Quinn’s (2009) observation that social media provide:

A rich ecosystem of tools supporting communities to share thinking, solve problems, and create innovative new solutions is a fountain of new value to the organization.

This year Ning is changing account structures and a number of users of the service have chosen to migrate their content to other sites. I wondered if the word to describe this move was migratning.

Given the IACSS09 site was a specific attempt to use social media for an event I have decided to close the Ning site. Ning provided the export tools for this activity:

I have reposited the IOCSS09 Ning archive at this Box.Net link. Some Ning groups have moved their site content to Grou.ps. Ozgur Kuru provides some additional information about this process.

Some time ago I thought I might distribute the information about IACSS09 in the cloud. In addition to the Box.Net link

This process has helped me understand the potential of social media tools and has underscored the importance of curating ephemeral content. Some material from the conference is unavailable including the official web site and the Twitter #iacss09 tag.

Photo Credit

Tangled


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#HPRW10: Connected

Day 3 of the AIS’s Performance Research Workshop in Canberra will start with a Panel Presentation. The topic for the Panel to address is How do we make the research effort into high performance sport more effective?

The panel members are: Allan Hahn, Kristine Toohey, Martin Fitzsimons, Michael McKenna and Gavin Reynolds.

This is a draft of my thoughts hosted by SlideShare:

I have added a slide to this presentation that is my pitch for the Australian research network to work together as an Open Access community.

I am looking forward to hearing the views of my panel colleagues. I will be very interested to explore the synergies between my presentation and Gavin Reynold’s views on the role the National Sport Information Centre (NSIC) can play in a shared community of practice. This is a SlideShare presentation of the NSIC’s OASIS approach presented by Gavin last year at a World Symposium of Computer Science in Sport..